tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
For judges, the immediately pressing question was how the common law of tort should be adapted to accommodate the statutory standards.
to uphold and apply the principles of the common law of tort even
Street, The Law of Torts (London: Butterworth & Co.
Without exception, each judge bases his or her decision either on the postulate that the law of tort is wholly private and not public, or that the law of tort is wholly public and not private.
Blum and Steinhardt suggested that the Article III problem could be solved by reading the ATS as a grant of authority "to create a federal common law of torts to give effect to the purposes of international norms," (54) a possibility supported by the Supreme Court's decision in Textile Workers Union v.
Restatement of the Law of Torts, or in a torts treatise.
100) For such a person 'would consider that the law of tort has no business to provide legal remedies consequent on the birth of a healthy child, which all of us regard as a valuable or good thing' (rather than a burden within a distributive justice scheme).
We should look outside of the law of tort, perhaps outside of all law, for ultimate protection of finances.
The private law of torts illustrates one origin of the prohibition on coerced benevolence and is thereby helpful in understanding the injustice of redistribution.
of California Hastings), Levine, and Bernstein present a textbook for law students on the common law of torts and key topics like intentional torts and privileges, negligence, strict liability, and products liability, as well as damages, joint and several liability, nuisance, economic torts, misuse of legal process, defamation, and privacy.
208) In truth, the common law of torts had never recognized a cause of action derivative on the violation of a right of a third party, a point on which we elaborate below.
DOBBS, THE LAW OF TORTS 280 (2000) ("The reasonable person whose