tort

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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
The question that arises is whether and to what extent the massive technological and social changes that resulted impacted the development of the law of tort as it acquired its modern form.
In the law of torts, derivative claims are not merely "unusual"; they are not recognized.
129) In imposing a regime of civil tort liability, rather than letting the matter be resolved by contract, they held that "[t]he law of torts is directed toward compensation" and that "[t]ort law also serves the 'prophylactic' purpose of preventing future harm; payment of damages provides a strong incentive to prevent the occurrence of harm.
27) Vicarious Liability in the Law of Torts (London: Butterworths, 1967) at 20 and 124.
27) Pollock was even more scathing--in a review of Winfield's Province of the Law of Tort written some years after Addison's death, he dismissed Addison as someone "for whose judgment nobody now cares a farthing", declared that Addison's "book on Tort was only less bad than his book on Contracts," and went on to take a swipe at those "who see nothing but shreds and patches in the law of civil wrongs.
The law of torts is concerned primarily with ensuring compensation for loss, hot for vindicating rights.
19) The primary role of the law of torts is to reconcile the competing claims of liberty and our security in a way which secures favorable conditions for the exercise of our rational agency.
Osborne, The Law of Torts (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2000) at 13.
1645, 1652 (2014) ("[T]he legal norms the First Congress had in mind when enacting the ATS were not protean international law norms, but rather the domestic law of tort.
Mastering torts; a student's guide to the law of torts, 5th ed.
As mentioned above, the Israeli Tort Ordinance, enacted during the British Mandate, reflected the British common law of the time by codifying the existing common law of torts in one coherent, legally binding text.
on the descriptive claim "that the common law of torts is best