combatant

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The targets being hit in Pakistan do not meet the criteria to be lawful combatant as they are not engaged in actual hostile act; moreover, they are outside of the actual battlefield.
the armed forces qualify as lawful combatants, and that only combatants
Lawful combatants are subject to capture and detention as prisoners of war by opposing military forces.
38) Lawful combatants are "armed forces of a Party to a conflict" and have a privileged status in that they cannot be prosecuted for engaging the enemy, but can be targeted by the enemy.
103) The prosecution argued that any killing of a lawful combatant by an unlawful combatant would violate the law of war, stating that "[t]he U.
States have been absolutely unwilling to extend this privilege with its accordant lawful combatant immunity to non-state operatives.
A person who engages in military raids by night, while purporting to be an innocent civilian by day, is neither a civilian nor a lawful combatant.
She follows George Fletcher in differentiating between the commission of prosecutable crimes and the failure to achieve lawful combatant status: "The basic difference is that the violation of the first kind of rule generates liability and punishment.
Although largely overlooked in public discussion to date, a fairly substantial body of post-WWII war crime jurisprudence clearly establishes denial of a fair trial as a war crime, with cases addressing trials of both POWs and civilians who had no claim to lawful combatant status.
44 (3) of the First Additional Protocol of June 1977 (which standardizes the criteria for lawful combatant status irrespective of one's membership of regular or irregular formations).
If a lawful combatant is captured in the context of a military engagement, he is entitled to the prisoner of war protections of the Geneva Conventions and the common law of war that preceded them.
202) Second, there is no principled distinction between a contractor hired from South Africa and one hired from Australia that justifies labeling one a mercenary, and the other a lawful combatant.