in limine

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in limine

(in limb-in-ay) from Latin for "at the threshold," referring to a motion before a trial begins. A motion to suppress illegally-obtained evidence is such a motion. (See: motion to suppress)

in limine

‘on the threshold’. A preliminary point or plea is said to be made in limine.

IN LIMINE. In or at the beginning. This phrase is frequently used; as, the courts are anxious to check crimes in limine.

References in periodicals archive ?
The location was bought for $58,000 in July 2007 from Limine Mortgage LLC, led by Dave Paes.
As known among the bench and bar, trials can invoke any number of trial-related motions, including motions in limine objecting to the introduction of certain evidence at trial.
There are various potential grounds for appeal and ways to preserve issues for appeal, including dispositive motions, motions in limine,* jury instructions, and post-trial motions.
If the trial court makes a tentative ruling or defers ruling on the motion in limine, the non-prevailing party must either proffer the excluded evidence (2) or contemporaneously object to the admitted evidence at trial (3) in order to preserve the claimed evidentiary error for appellate review.
Wohlgelernter's presentation focused on motions in limine, providing insight into the handling of these motions from both the plaintiff's and defense perspectives.
Both prior to and during the course of the trial, the plaintiff filed motions in limine challenging the admissibility of Dr.
Wright also recommends submitting draft motions in limine and jury instructions early.
DAG Akhtar Awan has been asked to assist the court on the issue whether the petition was maintainable or should be dismissed in limine.
The new "Traumatic Brain Injuries" litigation packet from the AAJ Exchange explores case investigation, filing, discovery, common defenses, motions in limine, the science of TBI, testing, experts, and trial.
85) The government, however, prevailed in a pretrial motion in limine to prevent the appellant from testifying about his reasonable apprehension of death or serious bodily injury.
Transcript of Oral Decision on Motion in Limine at 10, Borders v.
2001) (holding that 'once a trial court makes an unequivocal ruling admitting evidence over a movant's motion in limine, the movant's subsequent introduction of that evidence does not constitute a waiver of the error for appellate review')," the court said in its October 20 per curiam opinion.