public company

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public company

a registered company that can offer its shares to the public. Its memorandum of association must state that it is a public company, that its authorized capital is at least the authorized minimum (£50,000) and that its name ends with plc (or public limited company).
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded in 2012 by seasoned investor relations veteran and entrepreneur Kathy Zhang, AFS currently has several thousand institutional investors interacting with the management of over 300 listed companies in Asia.
Foreign listed companies would become eligible for inclusion in the MSCI World and MSCI Emerging Markets Indexes in cases where they would cumulatively represent more than 5% of the MSCI Country IMI and 0.
This lack of awareness has been witnessed in most of the recent filings, where the accounts of a majority of listed companies filed through eService, were submitted to the Registrar of Companies, thereby discharging their obligation for submission of these documents towards the Registrar only, and not with the Enforcement Department.
It was carried out over a period of three months and involved all forty-two listed companies.
Sessions focused on practical case studies and explained the importance of investor relations for listed companies and financial markets.
Listed companies were required to disclosure their financial results for the quarter no later than 45 days after the end of the period.
The top 150 listed companies survey carried by Gulf Business magazine, is based on market capitalization as of Aug.
In a written request sent to the listed companies, the TSE asked them not to conduct stock splits resulting in one share breaking up into more than five shares at one time, TSE officials said.
The whole idea of capital markets and public stock exchanges is to provide the means for the efficient reallocation of individual savings (of which Japan has an abundance) into publicly listed companies through the capital markets and the securities exchanges.
Mazars European IFRS survey results showed 73 percent of listed companies believed that applying IFRS would result in a greater degree of transparency, and nearly 79 percent of them think that IFRS will contribute towards making financial statements more reliable.
They hold large investments in other listed companies; many of them also are companies in the business of insuring the directors and officers of listed companies, not to mention the statutory auditors of listed companies.
Not only did the exchange stand tall in the days after September 11, it took the lead in setting exacting standards in corporate governance--at least for its listed companies.