logic

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logic

noun analytic, analytical, argument, art of controversy, art of disputation a, chain of reaaoning, cogent, common sense, course of argument, course of thought, deduction, dialectic, dialectical, explanation, good sense, inference, line of reasoning, logical reasoning, method of reasoning, philosophical, polemics, process of reasoning, ratiocination, rationalization, reason, reasoned, reasoning, science of reasoning, sense, sound judgment, sound reasoning, thought process, wisdom
Associated concepts: laws of logic, logical relevancy
See also: common sense, data, dialectic, ratiocination, reason
References in periodicals archive ?
Ljubovic consistently chooses a perspective that is so general that any individual contribution made by the mentioned Bosnian logicians is elided.
The only time that Ljubovic indicates a disagreement between the Bosnian logicians is when he notes that Hasan Kafi recognized four productive moods of the fourth figure, whereas 'Allamek Bosnavi and Mostari accepted eight (pp.
The significance of Francesco's work is that it demonstrates an early "strong and direct scholastic influence on the development of Politian's logical studies" (25) and shows how the antagonism between scholastic logicians and humanist rhetoricians in an instance such as this did not preclude the use of both arts by those Renaissance figures who seriously pursued goal of learned eloquence.
Of these three chapters, the most fascinating is that treating molecular propositions since it not only adverts, in general, to parallel treatments in modern sentential logic but also shows the extent to which medieval logicians constructed formal inference rules of the highest level of abstraction, centuries before such rules were "discovered" in the development of modern mathematical logic.
Second, the systematic approach taken by Broadie, despite its considerable advantages, does create the misleading impression of a greater degree of unanimity among medieval logicians than actually was to be found and conveys nothing of the historical development of medieval logic.
Another group of works eschews graphic or plastic incarnation to participate in a type of esthetic response that has often been remarked upon by mathematicians, logicians, and others who deal with thought in highly formalized ways.
Crane's scope is broad: beginning with logicians and rhetoricians such as Agricola, she moves to the education manuals of Ascham and Elyot, then to humanist texts such as More's Utopia, and then to the writings of William Cecil, and finally to the more "traditionally" literary figures Heywood and Wyatt, through the poetic miscellanies of the middle and later half of the century, to Turberville, Gascoigne and Whetstone, and finally to Sidney.
Courtenay documents some twenty-five other Oxford logicians working through the century, up to and beyond John Wyclif's 1361 logical treatise.