Mariner

(redirected from Mariners)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

MARINER. One whose occupation is to navigate vessels on the sea. Vide Seamen Shipping articles.
     2. By act of congress, 1 Story, Laws of U. S., ch. 56, s. 4, p. 109, it is provided, that no sum exceeding one dollar shall be recovered from any seaman or mariner (in the merchant service,) by any person, for any debt contracted during the time such seaman or mariner shall actually belong to any ship or vessel, until the voyage for which such seaman or mariner engaged, shall be ended.

References in classic literature ?
Nothing further passed between the mariner and Hester Prynne.
In the joy of their success, however, and amidst the sports, dancing, and other merriment, with which these young folks wore away the time, they never once thought whether their sails were black, white, or rainbow colored, and, indeed, left it entirely to the mariners whether they had any sails at all.
I'll lay my wage an' share 'tis more'n half play-actin' to him, an' he consates himself he's a bowld mariner.
Plenty for all," the Ancient Mariner startled Daughtry by cackling shrilly.
Oodles and oodles of it, gold and gold and better than gold, in cask and chest, in cask and chest, a fathom under the sand," the Ancient Mariner assured him in beneficent cackles.
Eighteen days in the longboat," the Ancient Mariner shrilled, to Daughtry's startlement.
Sea stewards put on some style, I must say," commented the wheat- farmer, oblivious to the Ancient Mariner, who still declaimed of the heat of the longboat.
Then on they gladly sailed, the albatross following, until one day the Ancient Mariner, in a mad moment, shot the beautiful bird.
But one day as the Mariner watched the water snakes, the only living things in all that dreadful waste, he blessed them unaware, merely because they were alive.
People did not understand The Ancient Mariner, and they laughed at Wordsworth's simple lyrics, although the last poem in the book, Tintern Abbey, has since become famous, and is acknowledged as one of the treasures of our literature.
Almost every one has felt the weird charm of 'The Ancient Mariner,' where all the unearthly story centers about a moral and religious idea, and where we are dazzled by a constant succession of such pictures as these:
I am going to unexplored regions, to "the land of mist and snow," but I shall kill no albatross; therefore do not be alarmed for my safety or if I should come back to you as worn and woeful as the "Ancient Mariner.