mark

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Related to Marks: Quotation marks, Punctuation marks

mark

n. 1) an "X" made by a person who is illiterate or too weak to sign his/her full name, used in the expression "His Mark," or "Her Mark." On the rare occasion that this occurs, the "X" should be within or next to a notation such as "Theresa Testator, her mark." If the mark is intended as a signature to a will it should be formally witnessed (as signatures are) to make the will valid. (See: will)

mark

noun autograph, badge, characteristic, check, cipher, countermark, emblem, identification, idiosyncrasy, imprint, indication, initials, manifestation, marker, proof, record, representation, sign, signature, stamp, symbol, token, trace, trademark, vestige
See also: attaint, attend, brand, characteristic, characterize, clue, color, complexion, concern, consider, deface, degree, demarcate, denote, designate, designation, discriminate, distinguish, earmark, eminence, expression, feature, goal, heed, importance, impression, index, indicant, indication, indicator, inscribe, inscription, intention, interest, label, magnitude, manifest, manifestation, monument, note, notice, objective, observe, particularity, perceive, prestige, property, recognize, record, regard, reputation, select, sign, significance, signify, smear, speciality, specialty, stain, stamp, subscribe, symbol, symptom, target, trademark, trait, watch, witness

MARK. This term has several acceptations. 1. It is a sign traced on paper or parchment, which stands in the place of a signature, usually made by persons who cannot write. 2 Cart. R. 324; M. & M. 516; 12 Pet. 150; 7 Bing. 457; 2 Ves. 455; 1 V. & B. 362; 1 Ves., jr. 11. A mark is now held to be a good signature, though the party was able to write. 8 Ad. & El. 94; 3 Nev. & Per. 228; 3 Curt. 752; 5 John. 144. Vide Subscription.
     2.-2. It is the sign, writing or ticket put upon manufactured goods to distinguish them from others. Poph. R. 144; 3 B & C. 541; 2 Atk. R. 485; 2 V. & B. 218; 3 M. & C. 1; Ed. Inj. 814. Vide Trade Marks.
     3.-3. Mark or marc, denotes a weight used in several parts of Europe, and for several commodities, especially gold and silver. When gold and silver are sold by the mark, it is divided into twenty-four carats.
     4.-4. Mark is also in England a money of accounts, and in some other countries a coin. The English marc is two-thirds of a pound sterling, or 13s. 4d., and the Scotch mark is of equal value in Scotch money of account. Ency. Amer. h.t.

References in classic literature ?
Then Dantes rose more agile and light than the kid among the myrtles and shrubs of these wild rocks, took his gun in one hand, his pickaxe in the other, and hastened towards the rock on which the marks he had noted terminated.
He had left his own marks all over that small patch of gravel.
The afternoon had come when the Sheriff mounted his horse and joined Robin Hood, who stood outside the gateway of the paved court waiting for him, for he had sold his horse and cart to a trader for two marks.
Now observe the case of the several breeds of pigeons: they are descended from a pigeon (including two or three sub-species or geographical races) of a bluish colour, with certain bars and other marks; and when any breed assumes by simple variation a bluish tint, these bars and other marks invariably reappear; but without any other change of form or character.
If he couldn't say them, or seem to say them, by reading them off the master's or some other boy's book who stood near, he was sent back, and went below all the boys who did so say or seem to say them; but in either case his vulgus was looked over by the master, who gave and entered in his book, to the credit or discredit of the boy, so many marks as the composition merited.
Indeed he began to have great doubts whether the master wouldn't remember them, and so only throw them in as extra lines, because in any case they would call off attention from the other tags, and if detected, being extra lines, he wouldn't be sent back to do more in their place, while if they passed muster again he would get marks for them.
The thumb is wanting and we have only the mark of the palm; but if we follow the trace of the hand," I continued, "we see that, after leaving its imprint on the wall, the touch sought the door, found it, and then felt for the lock--"
My friend next occupied himself with the mark of the bullet in the wall.
It was easy to tell that they had been before the others, because in places their marks had been entirely obliterated by the others coming upon the top of them.
The marks in the road showed me that the horse had wandered on in a way which would have been impossible had there been anyone in charge of it.
It was sufficient, in short, to know that Bevis Marks was revolutionised by these popular movements, and that peace and quietness fled from its precincts.
There's another,' repeated Brass; 'and if I could get a break and four blood horses to cut into the Marks when the crowd is at its thickest, I'd give eighteen-pence and never grudge it