meaning

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meaning

noun acceptation, connotation, content, definition, denotation, drift, explanation, idea, import, purport, semantics, semasiology, sense, significance, significatio, signification, substance, tenor, text, vis
Associated concepts: plain meaning, secondary meaning
Foreign phrases: Primo excutienda est verbi vis, ne sermoois vitio obstruatur oratio, sive lex sine argumentis.The force of a word should be ascertained in the beginning, lest the sentence be destroyed by the fault of expression, or the law be without reason. Sensus verborum est anima legis. The meaning of words is the spirit of the law. In testamennis ratio tacita non debet considerari, sed verba solum spectari debent; adeo per divinationem mentis a verbis recedere durum est. In wills an unexpressed intention ought not to be considered, but the words alone ought to be regarded; for it is difficult to recede from the words by guessing at their intention.
See also: connotation, consequence, construction, contents, context, definition, design, essence, explanation, gist, import, intent, main point, paraphrase, purview, significance, signification, spirit, substance, sum, tenor
References in classic literature ?
Let us first consider what sort of object a word is when considered simply as a physical thing, apart from its meaning.
Spoken and written words are, of course, not the only way of conveying meaning.
Boswell gave a new meaning to the word biographer, that is the writer of a life, and now when a great man has had no one to write his life well, we say "He lacks a Boswell.
Yet even the German books are not entirely free from attacks of the Parenthesis distemper--though they are usually so mild as to cover only a few lines, and therefore when you at last get down to the verb it carries some meaning to your mind because you are able to remember a good deal of what has gone before.
You fall into error occasionally, because you mistake the name of a person for the name of a thing, and waste a good deal of time trying to dig a meaning out of it.
His meaning, as his own words import, and still more conclusively as illustrated by the example in his eye, can amount to no more than this, that where the WHOLE power of one department is exercised by the same hands which possess the WHOLE power of another department, the fundamental principles of a free constitution are subverted.
Some of these reasons are more fully explained in other passages; but briefly stated as they are here, they sufficiently establish the meaning which we have put on this celebrated maxim of this celebrated author.
Yes," looked the invalid, his eye beaming with delight at the ready interpretation of his meaning.
In the vast warp of life (a river arising from no spring and flowing endlessly to no sea), with the background to his fancies that there was no meaning and that nothing was important, a man might get a personal satisfaction in selecting the various strands that worked out the pattern.
If there's no meaning in it,' said the King, `that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn't try to find any.
More uprightly and purely speaketh the healthy body, perfect and square- built; and it speaketh of the meaning of the earth.
She stared, taking my meaning in; but it produced in her an odd laugh.