Mile

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MILE, measure. A length of a thousand paces, or seventeen hundred and sixty yards, or five thousand two hundred and eighty feet. It contains eight furlongs, every furlong being forty poles, and each pole sixteen feet six inches. 2 Stark. R. 89.

References in classic literature ?
We proceeded with all possible expedition until we came within fifteen miles of where Boonsborough now stands, and where we were fired upon by a party of Indians that killed two, and wounded two of our number; yet, although surprised and taken at a disadvantage, we stood our ground.
I took three-quarters of a mile of rope and fastened one end of it around the waist of a guide, and told him to go find the road, while the caravan waited.
I rose up, and there was Jackson's Island, about two mile and a half down stream, heavy timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights.
The distance over which conversations can be held has been increased from twenty miles to twenty-five hundred.
We heaved the log, and calculated that the Abraham Lincoln was going at the rate of 18 1/2 miles an hour.
By evening, the log showed that two hundred and twenty miles had been accomplished from Hong Kong, and Mr.
Forty millions of miles it was from us--more than forty millions of miles of void.
They had eleven miles of open bay to traverse; the wind was fresh, the waves ran high.
Tahoe is from ten to eighteen miles wide, and its mountains shut it in like a wall.
The principal aim of his journey was to reconnoitre Lake Tchad, from which he was still three hundred and fifty miles distant.
As we ascended we found the air grew cooler and cooler, which was a great relief to us, and at dawn, so far as we could judge, we were not more than about a dozen miles from the snow line.
But that native land was too far off, and for a man going a thousand miles it is absolutely necessary to set aside his final goal and to say to himself: "Today I shall get to a place twenty-five miles off where I shall rest and spend the night," and during the first day's journey that resting place eclipses his ultimate goal and attracts all his hopes and desires.