miscarriage

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miscarriage

noun abortion, abortive attempt, abortive effort, bad behavior, breakdown, cadere, collapse, default, defeat, disappointment, downfall, failure, fiasco, frustration, futile effort, hopeless failure, ineffectiveness, innffectual attempt, loss, lost labor, misadventure, mischance, misconduct, misfire, mistake, negative reeult, noncompletion, nonfulfillment, nonperformance, overthrow, parum procedere, perdition, rout, ruin, secus procedere, stoppage, successlessness, total loss, unlawful act, unproductivity, vain attempt, vain effort
Associated concepts: miscarriage of justice
See also: accident, disaster, failure, misfortune

MISCARRIAGE, med. jurisp. By this word is technically understood the expulsion of the ovum or embryo from the uterus within the first six weeks after conception; between that time and before the expiration of the sixth month, when the child may possibly live, it is termed abortion. When the delivery takes place soon after the sixth month, it is denominated premature labor. But the criminal act of destroying the foetus at any time before birth, is termed in law, procuring miscarriage. Chit. Med. Jur. 410; 2 Dunglison's Human Physiology, 364. Vide Abortion; Foetus.

MISCARRIAGE, contracts, torts. By the English statute of frauds, 29, C. II., c. 3, s. 4, it is enacted that "no action shall be brought to charge the defendant upon any special promise to answer for the debt, default, or miscarriage of another person, unless the agreement," &c. "shall be in writing," &c. The word miscarriage, in this statute comprehends that species of wrongful act, for the consequences of which the law would make the party civilly responsible. The wrongful riding the horse of another, without his leave or license, and thereby causing his death, is clearly an act for which the party is responsible in damages, and therefore, falls within the meaning of the word miscarriage. 2 Barn. & Ald. 516; Burge on Sur. 21.

References in periodicals archive ?
A DAD who lost four unborn children in two years is raising awareness of the devastating impact of miscarriage on men.
My expectation is that, in a larger RA cohort, with a larger absolute number of miscarriages, the association will be significant.
Twenty-eight percent of those suffering a miscarriage reported that celebrities' disclosure of miscarriage had eased their feelings of isolation, and 46 percent said they felt less alone when friends disclosed their own miscarriages.
There will always be a debate about the best way to diagnose miscarriages and about whether the present safety margins are adequate.
Lisa Stelly The 28-year-old wife of Jack Osbourne recently announced that she had lost her baby boy in a late-term miscarriage with Dr Craig Lennox REALITY TV star Jack Osbourne's wife Lisa has sadly lost her baby after miscarrying in the second trimester of her pregnancy.
If a couple experiences three miscarriages in a row, they are referred to a specialist gynaecology clinic for investigations.
The study was adjusted for maternal age, education, the number of previous miscarriages, and income.
A Mumsnet poll of around 1,400 women who had a miscarriage in the last decade found 63% of women who miscarried at home following a hospital scan were not offered adequate pain relief.
SOLIHULL MP Lorely Burt helped Mumsnet launch their Campaign for Better Miscarriage Care in Parliament.
The woman and her husband, who already had two children, had spent 13 years desperately trying to increase their brood only to suffer multiple miscarriages.
Individually, these factors were unable to predict accurately the risk of miscarriages, but when the researchers combine blood and hCG levels to create what they called a "Pregnancy Viability Index," they found this was a consistently reliable predictor of a miscarriage.
Between 2009-2010, Adam and her colleagues followed 112 women with threatened miscarriages, who were between six and ten weeks pregnant.