Moral evidence

MORAL EVIDENCE. That evidence which is not obtained either from intuition or demonstration. It consists of those convictions of the mind, which are produced by the use of the senses, the testimony of men, and analogy or induction. It is used in contradistinction to mathematical, evidence. (q.v.) 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3050.

References in classic literature ?
If I made the matter public, I have no evidence but moral evidence to bring forward.
If you only want moral evidence to satisfy your own mind, your end is gained.
I can always grasp moral evidence easier than the other sorts.
Science's apparent immunity to moral refutation therefore poses a serious problem for any realist unhappy with top-down, theory-driven conceptions of the structure of moral evidence.
Article (4): The assets comprising the archeological collectibles and material and moral evidence kept with the Ministry of Heritage and Culture and the allocations of the Project of the National Museum shall affiliate to the National Museum.
Irrespective of the concrete evidence, the Syrian leadership sees that it has enough moral evidence that Lebanese hands are inciting what the leadership itself describes as strife," AL AKHBAR said.
Yeo does, however, present a fascinating discussion of Whewell's critical exegesis of the moral and intellectual character of scientists, with the majority, engaged in deductive habits of mind, exhibiting weaker religious feeling, and the minority, using inductive reasoning in the aid of discovery, displaying a greater ability to appreciate moral evidence.
Reasonable doubt is defined as follows: It is not a mere possible doubt; because everything relating to human affairs, and depending on moral evidence, is open to some possible or imaginary doubt.
Finally, Justice O'Connor looked to the instruction given by the trial court in Sandoval, which provided that "everything relating to human affairs, and depending on moral evidence, is open to some possible or imaginary doubt .
It is not mere possible doubt; because every thing relating to human affairs, and depending upon moral evidence, is open to some possible or imaginary doubt.
Reasonable doubt is defined as follows: It is not a mere possible doubt, because everything relating to human affairs, and depending an moral evidence, is open to some possible or imaginary doubt.