mother

(redirected from Mother-tongue)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
See: parents

mother

see PARENTAGE.

MOTHER, domestic relations. A woman who has borne a child.
     2. It is generally the duty of a mother to support her child, when she is left a widow, until he becomes of age, or is able to maintain himself; 8 Watts, R. 366; and even after he becomes of age, if he be chargeable to the public, she may, perhaps, in all the states, be compelled, when she has sufficient means, to support him. But when the child has property sufficient for his support, she is not, even during his minority, obliged to maintain him. 1 Bro. C. C. 387; 2 Mass. R. 415; 4 Miss. R. 97.
     3. When the father dies without leaving a testamentary guardian, at common law, the mother is entitled to be the guardian of the person and estate of the infant, until he arrives at fourteen years, when he is able to choose a guardian. Litt. sect. 123; 3 Co. 38; Co. Litt. 84 b; 2 Atk. 14; Com Dig. B, D, E; 7 Ves. 348. See 10 Mass. 135, 140; 15 Mass. 272; 4 Binn. 487; 4 Stew. & Part. 123; 2 Mass. 415; Harper, R. 9; 1 Root, R. 487.
     4. In Pennsylvania, the orphans' court will, in such case, appoint a guardian until the infant shall attain his fourteenth year. During the joint lives of the parents, (q.v.) the father (q.v.) is alone responsible for the support of the children; and has the only control over them, except when in special cases the mother is allowed to have possession of them. 1 P. A. Browne's Rep. 143; 5 Binn. R. 520; 2 Serg. & Rawle 174. Vide 4 Binn. R. 492, 494.
     5. The mother of a bastard child, as natural guardian, has a right to the custody and control of such child, and is bound to maintain it. 2 Mass. 109; 12 Mass. 387, 433; 2 John. 375; 15 John. 208; 6 S. & R. 255; 1 Ashmead, 55.

References in periodicals archive ?
An additional benefit of the teaching of mother-tongue languages would also be their preservation, said Bear Nicholas.
When both levels of governments and educators understand the multiple benefits of mother-tongue education is when changes will occur in the educational system, she added.
Students have expressed interest to Bear Nicholas about having some of their university courses taught in their mother-tongue language.
Currently, many children do not come to school speaking their mother-tongue language.
But it is still their mother-tongue, and everybody in the world has the right to their mother-tongue language," said Bear Nicholas.
A subsequent study by David Landin showed that the attitude of mission and church leaders toward mother-tongue Scriptures was the most significant factor affecting their use.
Global sociolinguistic factors in fact militate against vernacular languages, making the use of mother-tongue Scriptures the premier challenge for Bible translation in the twenty-first century.
For example, the Adioukrou of Cote d'Ivoire, with whom I lived for many years, abandoned their mother-tongue schools in the 1940s, believing that French schools would lead to a better future.
Mother-tongue Scriptures have quite a different reception in this climate than they did in earlier eras.