ombudsman

(redirected from Ombudsman Programs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

ombudsman

a person appointed by Parliament to investigate citizens' complaints. The name derives from the first example appointed in Sweden in 1809. There are now many in the UK, both in the public and private sector, and as a result of devolution, e.g. the Welsh Administrative Ombudsman (Ombudsman Gweinyddiaeth Cymru).
References in periodicals archive ?
The New York State Department of Health solicited bids for a statewide managed LTSS ombudsman program.
Ohio has been very good to the ombudsman program, recognizing the need for consumers to have an advocate wherever they may live, and has supported us very well to be able to provide that service," she says.
Real People, Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act.
In addition to bringing parties together to help resolve disputes in individual franchise systems, the IFA Ombudsman program serves the entire franchise community by helping identify industry-wide franchise relations trends and common conflicts.
For more information about the ombudsman program, call Montachusett Home Care Corp.
By retaining an outside third party, these employers are fostering the perception of neutrality and objectivity--both important elements for a successful ombudsman program.
Although Ombudsman programs are not allowed to recommend one nursing home over another, they can provide the results of the latest State inspection on the home and some information about the nursing home's complaint history.
Area agencies on aging and the meals and long-term care ombudsman programs were piloted and later written into the OAA to be permanent structures and service programs.
While the ombudsman program is a good place to begin your search for a nursing home, there are many other valuable community resources that you should consult before deciding which nursing homes to visit.
PPACA itself includes provisions requiring all exchanges to offer consumers access to "navigators," or independent exchange ombudsman programs.
Information would be made available to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the HHS Office of Inspector General, the states, and the state long-term care ombudsman programs upon request.
Usually, local ombudsman programs are headed by a paid coordinator who in turn has trained volunteer ombudsmen, who are assigned to facilities in the community.