receptor

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Related to Pain receptor: Chemoreceptors
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Andrew Dillin, a professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and senior author of a new paper describing these results, said they think that blocking this pain receptor and pathway could be very, very useful not only for relieving pain, but for improving lifespan and metabolic health, and in particular for treating diabetes and obesity in humans.
Neuropathic pain refers to pain that is not associated with specific pain receptors and probably represents damage to or sensitization of the nervous system (this is when pain becomes the disease process itself, rather than representing a "warning" of underlying pathology).
Other recent studies have shown that some itch inducers -- called pruritogens -- lead to activation of the capsaicin receptor, a pain receptor named for the incendiary chemical in chili peppers.
With this combined in vitro and in vivo study, researchers at Hydra and UCSF set out to determine whether TRPA1 activation could account for formalin's ability to activate pain receptors.
Other recent studies have shown that some itch inducers, called pruritogens, lead to activation of the capsaicin receptor, a pain receptor named for the incendiary chemical in chili peppers.
We believe that by 'turning off' the expression of pain receptors directly in the affected tissue, our ZFP Therapeutics potentially have significant advantages over approaches that are currently available and under development.
A pain receptor will make a neuron "fire" only when a specific molecule shows up to activate it.
Also, the entry of sodium and exiting of potassium in neurons help to stop the transmission of pain receptors (Heesen, Van de Velde, Klohr, Lehberger, Rossaint & Straube, 2014).
As well as taking pain medication (which works by interfering with pain receptors or the signals they send to the brain), you can try other strategies to help: C | ontrolled breathing - When we're in pain our breathing may become shallow and more rapid.
Floridians (Blake Carpenter and Joey Ragali), and physical mutants born without fear or pain receptors (Aaron "Jaws" Homoki).
Because there are no pain receptors in the GI tract, patients would not feel any pain from the drug injection.
Botox Botulinum toxin is believed to inhibit the release of peripheral nociceptive neurotransmitters - the pain receptors or nerve endings.