permission

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permission

noun acquiescence, allowance, approval, assent, authority, authorization, blessing, concurrence, copia, countenance, facultas, formal consent, full authorrty, grace, leave, license, potestas, sanction, tolerance, visa
Associated concepts: explicit permission, implied permission, permission of the court
Foreign phrases: Tout ce que la loi ne defend pas est perris.Everything which the law does not prohibit is allowed.
See also: acceptance, acquiescence, admittance, assent, authority, capacity, charter, concession, consent, discretion, dispensation, exception, favor, franchise, indorsement, indulgence, liberty, license, permit, privilege, right, sanction, sufferance, title, warrant

permission

in the English law of PRESCRIPTION, at common law any consent or agreement by the servient owners, whether oral or written, rendered the user a precarious possession; it made no difference how long ago the permission was given provided that the use was enjoyed under it and not under a claim to use as of right. Under the Prescription Act, this rule now applies to the shorter periods only (20 years for easements, 30 years for profits) but not to the longer periods (40 years for easements, 60 years for profits) where permission had to be given by deed to be effective.

PERMISSION. A license to do a thing; an authority to do an act which without such authority would have been unlawful. A permission differs from a law, it is a cheek upon the operations of the law.
     2. Permissions are express or implied. 1. Express permissions derogate from something which before was forbidden, and may operate in favor of one or more persons, or for the performance of one or more acts, or for a longer or shorter time. 2. Implied, are those, which arise from the fact that the law has not forbidden the act to be done. 3. But although permissions do not operate as laws, in respect of those persons in whose favor they are granted; yet they are laws as to others. See License.

References in classic literature ?
said everyone; and the bandmaster received permission to show the bird to the people the next Sunday.
Give me leave, senora, to obtain the permission I speak of," returned Don Quixote; "and if I get it, it will matter very little if he is in the other world; for I will rescue him thence in spite of all the same world can do; or at any rate I will give you such a revenge over those who shall have sent him there that you will be more than moderately satisfied;" and without saying anything more he went and knelt before Dorothea, requesting her Highness in knightly and errant phrase to be pleased to grant him permission to aid and succour the castellan of that castle, who now stood in grievous jeopardy.
It was his own fault that she was discussing him with his mother; he had wanted her support in his third attempt to win Lucy; he wanted to feel that others, no matter who they were, agreed with him, and so he had asked their permission.
Young Count Toll objected to the Swedish general's views more warmly than anyone else, and in the course of the dispute drew from his side pocket a well-filled notebook, which he asked permission to read to them.
Several of the other men now asked permission to come on deck, and soon all but those actually engaged in some necessary duty were standing around smoking and talking, all in the best of spirits.
After having granted this permission, the Prince proceeded on his way over the green amidst the most enthusiastic acclamations.
The reasons why I excluded him from my portrait-gallery are so honorab le to both of us, that I must ask permission briefly to record them.
In the meanwhile, sir, I ask permission to leave you to your rest.
When her request was granted, she besought permission to rear her puppies in the same spot.
The sovereign was so pleased with the wit of the reply that he gave her permission to scratch his Prime Minister's eyes out.
An old man named Daniel Baker, living near Lebanon, Iowa, was suspected by his neighbors of having murdered a peddler who had obtained permission to pass the night at his house.
One sunny afternoon in school, Cecily and Kitty Marr asked and received permission to sit out on the side bench before the open window, where the cool breeze swept in from the green fields beyond.