academy

(redirected from Platonic Academy)
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academy

an educational establishment established and maintained by a person who has entered into an agreement with the Secretary of State so to do, in England and Wales. As well as any special requirements in the contract, the school must have a curriculum that meets the current legal requirements but with an emphasis on a particular subject area or areas as specified in the agreement. It must provide education for pupils of different abilities who are wholly or mainly drawn from the area in which the school is situated. Any payments due under the agreement by the Secretary of State are dependent on the fulfilment of conditions and requirements imposed for the purpose of securing that no charge is made in respect of admission to (or attendance at) the school or, subject to such exceptions as may be specified in the agreement, in respect of education provided at the school.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seconda serie, Volume 41 (2001) are found the following articles: James Hankins, "The Invention of the Platonic Academy of Florence" (3-38); Cesare Vasoli, "Platone allo Studio fiorentino-pisano" (39-70); Elisabetta Scapparone, "Concezioni dell'anima: Ficino e Bodin" (71-92); Vittoria Perrone Compagni, "Astrologia e filosofia occulta in Agrippa" (93-112); Marco Matteoli and Rita Sturlese, "La nuova `arte' del Bruno in tre enigmi" (113-66); Fulvio Tessitore, "Croce e il Rinascimento" (167-95); Xavier E.
A major beachhead is established with Ficino and his Platonic Academy, whose existence Levi does not question although he cites the work of James Hankins, with the apogee of Italian humanism reached in Pico's Oration on the Dignity of Man.
But between his celebration of the Italians' bold casting aside of "faith, illusion, and childish prepossession," and his paean to that small "circle of chosen spirits," Pico and Ficino, who had advanced to the spirituality of Lorenzo de' Medici's Platonic academy, the Swiss Protestant found only fatalism, superstition, paganism, and a bewildering attachment to saints and sacraments.