Abuse of Power

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Abuse of Power

Improper use of authority by someone who has that authority because he or she holds a public office.

Abuse of power is different from usurpation of power, which is an exercise of authority that the offender does not actually have.

References in classic literature ?
The justest distribution of political power is that in which there is least waste of political ability.
This in its distribution of political power gives some weight to "virtue," some to wealth, and some to mere number.
The immediate aim of the Communist is the same as that of all the other proletarian parties: formation of the proletariat into a class, overthrow of the bourgeois supremacy, conquest of political power by the proletariat.
Political power, properly so called, is merely the organised power of one class for oppressing another.
With the universal adoption of Colour, all distinctions would cease; Regularity would be confused with Irregularity; development would give place to retrogression; the Workman would in a few generations be degraded to the level of the Military, or even the Convict Class; political power would be in the hands of the greatest number, that is to say the Criminal Classes, who were already more numerous than the Workmen, and would soon out-number all the other Classes put together when the usual Compensative Laws of Nature were violated.
And they have the political power still, if they only had the sense to use it for their preservation.
INASMUCH as I was now the second personage in the Kingdom, as far as political power and author- ty were concerned, much was made of me.
The conversation passed to the misuse of political power in the United States, but Anna quickly brought it round to another topic, so as to draw the steward into talk.
Even political power -- as in the case of Increase Mather -- was within the grasp of a successful priest.
The principle of election made it for a long while the great political power.
As a political power, as the rightful lord who is to tumble all rulers from their chairs, its presence is hardly yet suspected.
Thanks to compact organization, they were loosening the bonds of their dependence on the lords or bishops to whom most of them paid taxes; and the alliance of their representatives with the knights of the shire (country gentlemen) in the House of Commons, now a separate division of Parliament, was laying the foundation of the political power of the whole middle class.