Poll Tax


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Poll Tax

A specified sum of money levied upon each person who votes.

Poll taxes, as a prerequisite to voting in federal elections, are prohibited by the Twenty-Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and have been held unconstitutional with respect to state elections.

References in periodicals archive ?
The crucial night back then was in May 1988, when the amendment to make the change poll tax incomerelated was put to the vote.
The state argued that the new law rendered the poll tax argument moot.
The amount of Poll Tax arrears collected by local authorities across Scotland has fallen in recent years to less than Au350,000 in 2013-14, and some local authorities have ceased recovery of debts altogether.
But, while there was widespread organised resistance to the poll tax and active non-payment, some city residents who have recently been hit with backdated bills are adamant they know nothing about what they supposedly owe.
Sir John Major, who took over as PM from Mrs Thatcher in 1990, said that while she had been keen on the Poll Tax, many in the Conservative Party had been against it, and this had led to serious policy discussions.
The poll tax - $2 a year, levied on males only - set a pre-condition to voting, requiring the ability to read.
As a footnote, it would be interesting to see the effect if the various Socialist groups who so effectively organised the violent demonstrations against the Poll Tax were to turn their energies, in similar fashion, to protests against VAT and Road Tax using the same logic.
NOW we know why Mr Blair wants to impose a poll tax on our roads - it is a directive from the EU.
The law serves as a poll tax and shuts down community-based registration drives--effectively disenfranchising potential voters in Latino, Black and Native American communities, according to Nina Perales of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.