Poll Tax


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Poll Tax

A specified sum of money levied upon each person who votes.

Poll taxes, as a prerequisite to voting in federal elections, are prohibited by the Twenty-Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and have been held unconstitutional with respect to state elections.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Poll Tax and Margaret Thatcher disappeared in perfect unison, never to return.
Chancellor Nigel Lawson also warned that introducing the Poll Tax would leave the Tories exposed to "unacceptable political risks".
In July 1987 he approached Mrs Thatcher to express his concern over the level of opposition he was facing from councils over plans to phase in the poll tax over a period of years.
In July 1987 Mr Ridley approached Mrs Thatcher to voice concerns about the level of opposition he faced from councils over plans to phase in the poll tax.
The state argued that the new law rendered the poll tax argument moot.
But, while there was widespread organised resistance to the poll tax and active non-payment, some city residents who have recently been hit with backdated bills are adamant they know nothing about what they supposedly owe.
The poll tax - $2 a year, levied on males only - set a pre-condition to voting, requiring the ability to read.
As a footnote, it would be interesting to see the effect if the various Socialist groups who so effectively organised the violent demonstrations against the Poll Tax were to turn their energies, in similar fashion, to protests against VAT and Road Tax using the same logic.
NOW we know why Mr Blair wants to impose a poll tax on our roads - it is a directive from the EU.
Had the Conservative Party kept its nerve and refused to climb down, the poll tax might even have achieved its stated aim of making people realise just how much it costs to fund local authorities.