Pond

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POND. A body of stagnant water; a pool.
     2. Any one has a right to erect a fish pond; the fish in ii are considered as real estate, and pass to the heir and not to the executor. Ow. 20. See Pool; River; Water.

References in classic literature ?
Beyond the pond, on the slope that climbed to the cornfield, there was, faintly marked in the grass, a great circle where the Indians used to ride.
The pond, oblong in shape, had a width so scant compared to its length that, with its ends out of view, it might have been taken for a scant river.
When it was hot we used to stand by the pond in the shade of the trees, and when it was cold we had a nice warm shed near the grove.
After several times falling short of my destination and as often over-shooting it, I came unexpectedly round a corner, upon Mill Pond Bank.
She was nearly beside herself with grief, and roamed round and round the pond calling on her husband without ceasing.
It was tied to a water-plant in the middle of the pond.
And in the morning, one will arise as fresh as a lark and look at the window, and see the fields overlaid with hoarfrost, and fine icicles hanging from the naked branches, and the pond covered over with ice as thin as paper, and a white steam rising from the surface, and birds flying overhead with cheerful cries.
The beaver, of course, attacks those trees which are nearest at hand, and on the banks of the stream or pond.
Then I remembered that beyond these ploughed fields he was crossing lay Pilgrim's Pond, for which
Wetting his hair first--a sure sign of apathy--he followed Freddy into the divine, as indifferent as if he were a statue and the pond a pail of soapsuds.
Between the well and the Round Pond are the cricket-pitches, and frequently the choosing of sides exhausts so much time that there is scarcely any cricket.
On the further side of the pond the ground sloped downward toward the south, and revealed, over a low paling, a pretty view of a village and its church, backed by fir woods mounting the heathy sides of a range of hills beyond.