depression

(redirected from Postpartum Depression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Postpartum Depression: postpartum psychosis

depression

noun debasement, decline, deflation, depreciation, despondence, despondency, dispiritedness, dolefulness, economic decline, gloom, lowering, lowness, maeror, sinking, slump
Associated concepts: economic depression
See also: anguish, curtailment, decrease, distress, pessimism, prostration
References in periodicals archive ?
Varying causes have been cited for bringing on postpartum depression, including socio-economic factors such as poverty and homelessness; hormone changes; lack of support from the baby's father or other relatives; change of lifestyle, etc.
This new observation may help health care professionals in recognizing postpartum depression, which can have severe consequences for the mother, as well as the child and may impair the development of an attachment relationship.
Symptoms of postpartum depression lurk longer than those of the baby blues and can be more wide-ranging.
Many women -- especially single or low-income mothers -- are too ashamed or fearful to seek help for postpartum depression.
Postpartum depression could be brought on by a number of factors, including the changes in hormones after the pregnancy.
Low birth weight and long hospital stay were found as predictors of postpartum depression in mothers of infants with VLBW.
Starting in January of 2011, we are seeking the help of New Brunswick mothers who have previously experienced postpartum depression, and would be willing to use their knowledge and experience to help others.
As such, GOED conducted an analysis of the studies published to date and found that all of the previous studies finding no benefit on postpartum depression suffered from similar limitations, and that actually all of the specific findings from this study had been previously reported.
Postpartum depression was assessed at follow-up interviews that took place an average of eight months after delivery.
Abused women were roughly three times more likely than their nonabused counterparts to have postpartum depression.
Treating Postpartum Depression with Hypnosis: Addressing Specific Symptoms Presented by the Client.
1) In surveys completed 2-9 months postpartum, women reporting a mistimed or unwanted pregnancy had increased odds of saying that they had not used folic acid daily before conception, that they had smoked during pregnancy or since delivery, and that they suffered from postpartum depression.