precognition

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Related to Precognitions: Precognitive dreams, Premonitions

precognition

noun clairvoyance, foreboding, foresight, forethought, perception, prenotion, presage, prescience, presentiment

precognition

in Scottish legal practice, a statement by a witness taken by a lawyer, his clerk or agent. It is not only taken by a person other than the witness, but it is also framed by the precognoscer, so it is never certain that it reflects the precise words of the witness. While there is no obligation to give a precognition, in criminal law matters either the prosecution or the defence or both can apply to the court to have a person precognosed on oath in front of the court.

PRECOGNITION, Scotch law. The examination of witnesses who were present at the commission of a criminal act, upon the special circumstances attending it, in order to know whether there is ground for a trial, and to serve for direction to the prosecutor. But the persons examined may insist on having their declaration cancelled before they give testimony at the trial. Ersk. Princ. B. 4, t. 4, n. 49.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although spontaneous cases of precognition are notoriously hard to assess--whether in terms of their veridicality or in terms of the underlying process involved--one might expect experimental tests of precognition to be easier to assess.
Rhine, Smith and Woodruff's (1938) "psychic shuffle" experiment was a turning point in developing the testing methodology for precognition.
Subsequent to this finding experimenters used mechanical card shufflers with a predetermined number of turns to rule out the use of real-time ESP in precognition experiments, although a PK effect by the person using the shuffler was still theoretically possible.
Thus chapters 3-5 discuss telepathy, chapters 6-8 handle precognition, chapter 9 debates clairvoyance, and chapter 10 discusses psychokinesis (PK).
Chapter 7 reviews what a theory of precognition has to cover, and Chandler provides a short overview of various theories that have been expounded to date (e.
Chapter 8 builds on the understanding of precognition as telepathy of the future viewer, as suggested in chapter 6.