adolescence

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adolescence

noun adulescentia, immaturity, juvenility, minority, nonage, puberty, pubescence, puerility, youth
See also: nonage

ADOLESCENCE, persons. That age which follows puberty and precedes the age of majority; it commences for males at fourteen, and for females at twelve years completed, and continues till twenty-one years complete.

References in periodicals archive ?
A review of 18 studies reported that physical exercise, such as jogging, weight training, and bike riding, can help reduce problem behaviors in individuals with ASD.
Probe conditions were presented to assess the persistence of desired alternative behaviors (work completion and break mands) and resurgence of undesired problem behaviors.
In at least one study, however, a second-order factor structure did not describe the covariation among multiple indicators of problem behaviors (Welte, Barnes, & Hoffman, 2004).
Problem behaviors frequently are seen in children with special needs, and they may have many etiologies.
Persons with profound and multiple disabilities may frequently fail to engage in constructive activity and, instead, may display high levels of problem behavior (e.
Also, problem behaviors are related to internalizing problems such as depression and anxiety (Steinberg, 1993).
RECOGNIZE THAT THE PROBLEM BEHAVIOR OR ATTITUDE WAS "AN INEFFECTIVE CHOICE THAT MERELY SERVED THE MOMENT.
These methods, though usually provided with the best intentions, do nothing to address underlying causes, and, of course, they restrained a lot more than just problem behaviors.
Only a few studies with small samples (n < 100) have included Hmong (Lee, 2001; Portes & Rumbaut, 2001; Rick & Forward, 1992), yet the studies have assumed that acculturation gaps contributed to parent-adolescent conflicts, rather than considering the impact adolescent problem behaviors and school difficulties have on parent-adolescent relationships.
86) Smith suggests that providers of these services must be equipped with the skills necessary to reduce these problem behaviors during teaching sessions.
Problem behaviors such as self-injury, aggression, disruptive behavior in school settings, and motor or vocal stereotypies occur in over 60% of people with developmental or intellectual disabilities (Lowe et al.