memory

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memory

(Commemoration), noun celebration, writing

memory

(Retention), noun mind, recalling, reflection
See also: hindsight, recognition, recollection, remembrance, retention, retrospect

MEMORY. Understanding; a capacity to make contracts, a will, or to commit a crime, so far as intention is necessary.
     2. Memory is sometimes employed to express the capacity of the understanding, and sometimes its power; when we speak of a retentive memory, we use it in the former sense; when of a ready memory, in the latter. Shelf. on Lun. Intr. 29, 30.
     3. Memory, in another sense, is the reputation, good or bad, which a man leaves at his death. This memory, when good, is highly prized by the relations of the deceased, and it is therefore libelous to throw a shade over the memory of the dead, when the writing has a tendency to create a breach of the peace, by inciting the friends and relations of the deceased to avenge the insult offered to the family. 4 T. R. 126; 5 Co. R. 125; Hawk. b. 1, c. 73, s. 1.

MEMORY, TIME OF. According to the English common law, which has been altered by 2 & 3 Wm. IV., c. 71, the time of memory commenced from the reign of Richard the First, A. D. 1189. 2 Bl. Com. 31.
     2. But proof of a regular usage for twenty years, not explained or contradicted, is evidence upon which many public and private rights are held, and sufficient for a jury in finding the existence of an immemorial custom or prescription. 2 Saund. 175, a, d; Peake's Ev. 336; 2 Price's R. 450; 4 Price's R. 198.

References in periodicals archive ?
Procedural memory, which guides tasks that one performs, without conscious awareness of how one learned them, would be more useful for learning subtle rules related to language morphology.
The procedural memory and episodic memory are updated by chunking and episodic learning, respectively.
At the time of trauma, the memory of the body state of the person is stored in the procedural memory.
Brain regions involved in procedural memory do not overlap with those involved in either episodic or semantic memory.
BEPs seem to lose their declarative memory and their procedural memory appears to devolve.
It is comprised of three storage systems: episodic memory (facts or events), semantic memory (knowledge or beliefs about facts and events--"wisdom"), and procedural memory (sequences or patterns of behavior).
This procedural memory very much depends on lower parts of the brain, called the basal ganglia and cerebellum, which are not affected by amnesia and are not affected by dementia, so that even deeply amnesic people like Clive have all the procedural skills they have.
Some specific areas examined include a test model library for GUI testing of smartphone applications, history heuristic based negotiation of service level agreements for composite service, a method for measuring the size of a component-based system specification, selecting a high-quality central model for sharing architectural knowledge, and path and context sensitive inter- procedural memory leak detection.
The role and resiliency of repetitive religious activities in regard to the neuropsychological losses of AD will relate to procedural memory and emotional attachments.
Your ability to appropriately titrate a patient with obstructive sleep apnea using CPAP makes use of procedural memory.
This latter observation proposes that tradition is largely related to automatic processes of nondeclarative, procedural memory, a position that is somewhat extreme (Rubin 1995, 136).
Organizational cognition is explored in papers that address knowledge and the replication of technology, organizational routines as a form of procedural memory, culture and organizational learning, leadership as the management of meaning, and transaction theory.