pro-choice

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pro-choice

noun abortion advocate, accepting abortion, approving abortion, endorsing abortion, in favor of abortion, pro-abortion, sanctioning abortion, supporting legalized abortion, supportive of abortionGenerally: self-determination
Associated concepts: abortion on demand, legalized aborrion, spontaneous abortion, voluntary abortion
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the central forces pushing the Democratic Party towards prochoice exclusivity in the 1970s and 1980s, in fact, was the depth to which their opponents were able to use the prolife label as a central marker of a form of a broader social conservatism that much of the new Democratic coalition found deeply unpalatable.
Most curious is Baumgardner's claim that investment in advertising to reframe the prochoice debate has had no political impact.
The prochoice movement can lay an equally strong claim to an important strain in American and Western traditions.
Ehrenreich, like many of the prochoice movement's writers and intellectuals, would have us believe that the early fetus (and 90 percent of abortions take place in the first three months) is nothing more than a dewy piece of tissue, to be excised without regret.
Cuomo routinely used words like "tragedy" to describe abortion, despite the obvious discomfort this caused his prochoice supporters.
A similar feeling that things have not turned out the way they were supposed to pervades the medical wing of the prochoice movement.
Organizationally, differences between leftist and liberal prochoice groups were expressed in a politics of alliance, with leftist groups forming relations of solidarity with trade unions, other popular movements, and, in certain provinces, social democrats.
In contrast, our position is prowoman, profamily, prochild and prochoice.
Being exposed only to the expediency of a prochoice perspective can't help but influence future generations of physicians.
Our prochoice principles should affirm these patients as decision makers: not because we agree with their decision or would have made the same one for ourselves, but because we recognize that the reasons women seek abortion are as complex and varied as their own lives.
Perhaps because of my background, I think there's a logic to the prochoice position that deserves respect, even as we engage it critically.
In addition to respecting and upholding the rights of women around the world, being prochoice also just makes sense in terms of public health.