qualified majority voting

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qualified majority voting

a voting system, used by the EU Council of Ministers, enabling certain resolutions to be passed without unanimity.
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The European Council and its president (now an official position as per the Lisbon Treaty) retain the most powerful position within the CFSP as it is to "identify the strategic interests and objectives" of the EU and adopt CFSP decisions mainly based on unanimity, and QMV is not applicable in matters of defense and security matters.
These treaties collectively worked to extend QMV voting to major policy areas while also extending the co-decision procedure to most areas with required QMV voting.
The draft Constitution envisaged the double majority system for the QMV which, according to some countries, better reflects the true size of populations and at the same time acknowledges the smaller member states' fears of being overruled by the larger countries.
Constrained flexibility amounts to moving a small part of the multi-annual expenditure away from the unanimity of the MFF to the QMV of the annual budgetary procedure.
120) Beginning in 2009, the usual formula for a QMV will be approval by "at least 55% of the members of the Council, comprising at least fifteen of them and representing Member States comprising at least 65% of the population of the Union.
legislative co-decision with Parliament and QMV in Council, would fix the implementing arrangements of the European Research Area (Article III-149).
88) In addition, QMV will apply primarily to measures coordinating common entry and asylum requirements, not the status of TCNs after they have legally entered.
Under the QMV process, the EU Treaty assigns each member a number of votes weighted on the basis of its population, with a correction factor to give some added protection to members with the smallest populations.
QMV is a form of voting that grants representation to each member state on a population-weighted basis, rather than giving each member nation one representative.
The Court's discretion to interpret secondary legislation was curtailed by the move from unanimity to QMV in the Council (though its discretion in constitutional interpretation was unaffected because treaty revisions require unanimity among member states).
At the least, the inability to move to QMV shows a reluctance to give the EU too much power in the cultural realm.
Indeed the book's final chapter on Europe since 1945 treats little of the history of the period and instead offers an extended essay on the politics of European union, leaving the reader swimming in a sea of acronyms: EMU, EFTA, CAP, QMV, SEA, EMS, CFP, ECSC, EEC, EURATOM, OPEC, EDC.