Quean


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QUEAN. A worthless woman a strumpet. The meaning of this word, which is now seldom used, is said not to be well ascertained. 2 Roll. Ab. 296 Bac. Ab. Stander, U 3.

References in periodicals archive ?
The occurrences of boy, girl, kid, lad(die), lass(ock)(ie), man, quean and woman were then counted in both CMSW and in the RLS corpus using Wordsmith Tools (Scott, 2004); vocative forms were identified on the basis of a close qualitative reading of the occurrences; finally, figures were normalized per 10,000 words.
Kirsty Strachan is a pregnant bride; her "bairn, a bit quean, was born before seven months was past" (21).
lubricity, wenching, whoredom, concubinage (in the sense of mistress), debauchee, trollop, phyrne, slut, street-walker, strumpet, trull, cyprian, courtezan, adulteress, bawd, jade, jezebel, delilah, bitch, aspasia, conciliatrix, bona roba, chere amie, whore, lorette, mackerell, mistress, procuress, punk, quean, rig, satyr, whore-monger, badnio, badhouse, brothel, bawdy house.
1,695-4,540 Memphis (Tunica) Delta Quean Steamboat Co.
The consequence is that prostitutes are now only named by a variety of other expressions, whereas quean has basically died out.
Draw, Bardolph, cut me off the villain's head, throw the quean in the channel" (2.
She is without doubt 'the curstest quean in the world' (653), but her future seems linked to Huanebango's in that she too flouts social conventions: 'my father says I must rule my tongue.
Quoth Quentin, "'Quite quaint quean Quintrelle, Qua quaestor, 'quods' quirks quirts'd quell
1560 "Such a jade she is, and so curst a quean, She would out-scold the devil's dame I ween") (see also Mills 1989: 128 and Palmatier 1995: 215).
Nichil quasi aliud egi nisi ut animi mei status, vel siquid aliud nossem, notum fieret amicis; probabatur enim michi quod prima ad fratrem epystola Cicero idem ait, esse <<epystole proprium, ut is ad quean scribitur de his rebus quas ignorat certior fiat>>.
18) Aurelia's stint as a gypsy and the pregnant Page's cross-dressed onstage labor also logically lead to the final scene of More Dissemblers, in which Lactantio, the main dissembler in the play, laments his forced marriage to the mother of his child: "I had my fortune told me by a Gypsy seven years ago; she said then I should be the spoil of many a maid, and at seven years' end (19) marry a quean for my labour; which falls out wicked and true" (5.
Their children, the products of these beds, inherit the subversive inclinations as well, as depicted in "The Humor of a Cursed Quean.