real estate investment trust

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real estate investment trust

n. nick-named REIT, a real estate investment organization which finds investors and buys real property and gives each investor either a percentage interest in the property itself or an interest in a loan secured by a mortgage or deed of trust on the property. Usually the loan is used to develop the property and build upon it, and then there is a division of profits upon sale---if there is a profit.

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Both congress and the administration recognize that REITs should be allowed to evolve and compete with other properties," said Jay Hyde, a spokesman from the National Association of Real Estate Trusts (NAREIT), a trade association based in Washington, D.
The world's first Islamic REIT created upon such principles was the Malaysia-based Al Aqar KPJ REIT, launched in June 2006, which invested in domestic hospitals.
41 shares of REIT II common stock for each share of REIT I common stock.
Owners and developers seeking capital from REITs should be aware that bringing in a REIT partner will result in some requirements and restrictions that otherwise would not exist.
The team has also advised on numerous other significant REIT-related deals in the Asia-Pacific including Prospect REIT Investment Corporation's merger with Japan Rental Housing Investments Inc.
AJCA Section 243(b) amended the taxable REIT subsidiary (TRS) rules intended to prevent income shifting from aTRS to a REIT.
Once you get your working capital and the cash you need through a REIT, you don't need to look for additional capital unless you make a significant acquisition, such as a large chain.
A portion of most REIT dividends is treated as a return of capital.
A REIT may not derive more than 30% of its gross income from the sale or other disposition of stock or securities held for less than six months, property in prohibited transactions or most real property held for less than four years.
Look for a REIT with a clearly articulated and plausible strategy for adding value through development, rectifying deferred maintenance, active property management or repositioning the property.
Like most investors in non-traded REITs, KBS REITs were sold with typical promises of price stability, steady dividends, and steady returns.
The glowing predications stand in stark comparison to those of recent years, which seemed to grow successively gloomier despite the REIT industry's consistent double-digit returns.