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In Civil Law, relating to a thing (whether movable or immovable), as distinguished from a person. Relating to land, as distinguished from Personal Property. This term is applied to lands, tenements, and hereditaments.


adjective accurate, actual, ascertained, bonafide, conformable to fact, correct, dependable, factual, genuine, inartificial, incontestable, irrefutable, legitimate, natural, right, scientific, sincerus, sure, true, trustworthy, truthful, undeniable, undoubtable, unerroneous, unfallacious, unfeigned, unimagined, unimpeachable, unmistaken, unsimulated, unspurious, unsynthetic, valid, veracious, veritable, verus
Associated concepts: real estate, real party interest, real property, real servitude
See also: absolute, actual, apparent, authentic, bona fide, certain, conclusive, concrete, convincing, corporeal, de facto, definite, documentary, factual, faithful, genuine, legitimate, material, natural, objective, perceptible, peremptory, physical, ponderable, positive, pure, realistic, reliable, rightful, sterling, substantial, substantive, tangible, true, veridical


denoting or relating to immovable property such as land and tenements.

POINDING, REAL, or poinding of the ground, Scotch law. Though it be properly a diligence, this is generally considered by lawyers as a species of real action, and is so called to distinguish it from personal poinding, which is founded merely on an obligation to pay.
     2. Every debitum fundi, whether legal or conventional, is a foundation for this action. It is therefore competent to all creditors in debts which make a real burden on lands. As it proceeds on a, real right, it may be directed against all goods that can be found on the lands burdened but, 1. Goods brought upon the ground by strangers are not subject to this diligence. 2. Even the goods of a tenant cannot be poinded for more than his term's rent, Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 1, 3.

REAL. A term which is applied to land in its most enlarged signification. Real security, therefore, means the security of mortgages or other incumbrances affecting lands. 2 Atk. 806; S. C. 2 Ves. sen. 547.
     2. In the civil law, real has not the same meaning as it has in the common law. There it signifies what relates to a thing, whether it be movable or immovable, lands or goods; thus, a real injury is one which is done to a thing, as a trespass to property, whether it be real or personal in the common law sense. A real statute is one which relates to a thing, in contradistinction to such as relate to a person,

References in periodicals archive ?
Defence spending will rise in real terms as Britain maintains its Iraq and Afghanistan commitments and continues to fight international terrorism, Chancellor Gordon Brown said yesterday.
In 2014, Welsh average pay stood at PS24,384, falling in real terms by 1.
9 per cent in real terms between 2010 and 2014, pay for FTSE 100 bosses shot up by 26 per cent over the same period, says the TUC.
The growth rate in real terms is estimated at -5,4% in 2013, compared to -2,4% in 2012" it said.
Even by the most conservative inflation measures, that is actually a real terms cut of over 8%.
The magazine said take-home pay had fallen due to increased pension contributions while pay had dropped by 9% in real terms since 2010.
Workers, meanwhile, are earning an average of PS1,350 a year less in real terms than at the 2010 election.
Figures released Friday by the Statistical Service show that the GDP growth rate in real terms during the first quarter of 2013 is negative and estimated at -4.
4% in real terms in the period between the third quarter of 2009 and the third quarter of 2012.
A confidential paper drawn up by civil servants assessing the department for education's finances reveals that the chancellor's promise in 2010 to increase the frontline schools budget in real terms for four years "is not in fact what is happening".
The proposed increase in health spending, coupled with a public spending rise of 1 percent in real terms, would leave the government having to decide between welfare cuts, borrowing or an increase in taxation equivalent to a two percent VAT hike, representing an additional [pounds sterling]10bn savings.
Asking prices in Wales plummeted furthest in real terms.