recession

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RECESSION. A re-grant: the act of returning the title of a country to a government which formerly held it, by one which has it at the time; as the recession of Louisiana, which took place by the treaty between France and Spain, of October 1, 1800. See 2 White's Coll. 516.

References in periodicals archive ?
To answer that question, we examine conditions in 11 different recessions and the ensuing recoveries since the late 1940s.
Organizations serving people with long-term illnesses or disabilities are usually held harmless during recessions because government funders are aware that they have a moral and a practical necessity to protect the clients.
Transfer payments, though growing, rose at a rate below the average for all preceding recessions since 1960.
The longest of any recession since World War II officially began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009 (National Bureau of Economic Research 2010; Cawley, Moriya, and Simon 2011).
Knotek (2007) associates changes in Okun's coefficient with business cycles in the United States: The coefficient is, on average, smaller (in absolute value) in expansions than during recessions.
Major stockmarket declines themselves, such as the one seen in recent weeks, have usually happened during recessions.
US jobs still haven't returned after over the 37 months since the recession first started, according to report from DoubleLine Capital.
Keywords: forecasting, recessions, leading indicators, Markov switching, business cycles
Past recessions hampered states' ability to fund increased Medicaid enrollment and maintain existing services.
Although state tax increases usually closely follow recessions, legislators try to delay them as long as possible for several good reasons.
The study also found a dramatic increase in the number of households classified as "food insecure" during this recession.
economy in June 2009, marking the end of the recession that began in