representation

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Representation

Any action or conduct that can be turned into a statement of fact.

For example, displaying a car with an odometer reading of ten miles constitutes a representation to a prospective buyer that the car has only been driven ten miles.The term representation is used in reference to any express or implied statement made by one of the parties to a contract to another, regarding a particular fact or circumstance that serves to influence the consummation of the deal.

As applied to the law of Descent and Distribution, representation is the principle by which the issue of an individual who has died inherits the portion of an estate that such person would have taken if he or she had lived.

representation

n. 1) the act of being another's agent. 2) acting as an attorney for a client. 3) a statement of alleged fact either in negotiations or in court. (See: represent)

representation

(Acting for others), noun acting as attorney for, advocacy, agency, agentship, body of deleeates, body of deputies, deputation, rendering legal addice, rendering legal assistance, speaking for another, supplying another's place

representation

(Statement), noun account, assertion of facts, asseveration, declaration, depiction, effigies, explanation, illustration, imago, indication, narration, narrative, portraiture, portrayal, presentation, report, setting forth
Associated concepts: false representation, material repreeentation, misrepresentation, public representation
See also: agency, assertion, brief, color, concept, copy, cross section, declaration, definition, delegation, delineation, deputation, design, designation, disclosure, disguise, duplicate, election, embodiment, example, illustration, indicant, manifestation, model, narration, paraphrase, part, performance, profession, proxy, recital, rendition, resemblance, role, sample, semblance, substitute, suggestion, symbol

representation

1 a statement of fact. A representation should be distinguished from a statement of opinion for many legal purposes, especially in relation to contractual obligations.
2 in the law of succession, the concept by which issue of predeceasing issue of the deceased are entitled to take their deceased ancestor's share.

REPRESENTATION, insurances. A representation is a collateral statement, either by writing not inserted in the policy, or by parol, of such facts or circumstances relative to the proposed adventure, as are necessary to be communicated to the underwriters, to enable them to form a just estimate of the risk.
     2. A representation, like a warranty, may be either affirmative, as where the insured avers the existence of some fact or circumstance which may affect the risk; or promissory, as where he engages the performance of, something executory.
     3. There is a material difference between a representation and a warranty.
     4. A warranty, being a condition upon which the contract is to take effect, is always a part of the written policy, and must appear on the face of it. Marsh. Ins. c. 9, Sec. 2. Whereas a representation is only a matter of collateral information or intelligence on the subject of the voyage insured, and makes no part of the policy. A warranty being in the nature of a condition precedent, must be strictly and literally complied with; but it is sufficient if the representation be true in substance, whether a warranty be material to the risk or not, the insured stakes his claim of indemnity upon the precise truth of it, if it be affirmative, or upon the exact performance of it, if executory; but it is sufficient if a representation be made without fraud, and be not false in any material point, or if it be substantially, though not literally, fulfilled. A false warranty avoids the policy, as being a breach of the condition upon which the contract is to take effect; and the insurer is not liable for any loss though it do not happen in consequence of the breach of the warranty; a false representation is no breach of the contract, but if material, avoids the policy on the ground of fraud, or at least because the insurer has been misled by it. Marsh. Insur. B. 1, c. 10, s. 1; Dougl. R. 247: 4 Bro. P. C. 482.
     See 2 Caines' R. 155; 1 Johns. Cas. 408; 2 Caines' Cas. 173, n.; 3 Johns. Cas. 47; 1 Caines' Rep. 288; 2 Caines' R. 22; Id. 329; Sugd. Vend. 6; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t. and Concealment; Misrepresentation.

REPRESENTATION, Scotch law. The name of a plea or statement presented to a lord ordinary of the court of sessions, when his judgment is brought under review.

References in classic literature ?
He has evidently taken part of his ideas concerning it from the representations of others, who have somewhat exaggerated its features.
I was not yet so perfectly beside myself as to be heedless of these representations, and therefore toiled on, ineffectually endeavouring to appease the thirst which consumed me, by thinking that in a short time I should be able to gratify it to my heart's content.
This figurative address seemed to have great weight with the young man, who gradually yielded to the representations of Marmaduke, and eventually consented to his proposal.
The Russian government had made representations to that of the United States of these malpractices on the part of its citizens, and urged to have this traffic in arms prohibited; but, as it did not infringe any municipal law, our government could not interfere.
The abomination of flowers, or representations of well-known objects of any kind, should not be endured within the limits of Christendom.
It must not be, if by any fair interference of friendship, any representations from one who had almost a mother's love, and mother's rights, it would be prevented.
His sister, too, is, I hope, convinced how little the ungenerous representations of anyone to the disadvantage of another will avail when opposed by the immediate influence of intellect and manner.
The faculty of giving to representations of nature or of thought their true coloring constitutes genius, and often, in this respect, passion takes the place of it.
IT IS a miserable state of mind, to have few things to desire, and many things to fear; and yet that commonly is the case of kings; who, being at the highest, want matter of desire, which makes their minds more languishing; and have many representations of perils and shadows, which makes their minds the less clear.
The crowds of agricultural labourers who had come out to the country in his wake, dazzled by representations of easy independence, had suffered, died, and wasted away.
Woodcourt had only quieted the man by undertaking to come to our house very early in the morning with these representations.
Morland was successfully confirming her own opinions by the justness of her own representations, Catherine was silently reflecting that now Henry must have arrived at Northanger; now he must have heard of her departure; and now, perhaps, they were all setting off for Hereford.

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