Residuum


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Residuum

That which remains after any process of separation or deduction; a balance; that which remains of a decedent's estate after debts have been paid and gifts deducted.

See: balance, remainder, residual, surplus
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the crude oils processed at US refineries are not producing enough residuum, US refineries have been forced to source more from other refineries overseas that process heavier crudes or lack their own coking facilities.
Because of the high sulfur content of the residuum, burning heavy fuel oils results in more harmful emissions than alternatives such as diesel fuel.
The affected limb of the participant was cast with plaster of paris bandage following indelible marking of bony landmarks and sensitive areas of the residuum and measurement of circumferences and mediolateral dimensions across the ankle and forefoot.
It also results in cracking the bonds of residuum elements, thereby enhancing the crude quality.
A residuum offibrinoid necrosis is still identified below the surface (figure, C).
Stories are the residuum and stimulus of our collective experience.
The fragipan appears to represent a paleo-surface involving loess deposition onto weathered limestone residuum.
Dr Anne Ross, exceedingly well qualified to treat so difficult a subject, accordingly places her study against the widest background of Celtic culture and civilization from the earliest time to the residuum of archaic tradition, still discernible in the middle of the 20th century, like the fragment of the Taon occurring in the oral repertoire of a farmer in Skye.
Only 8 of the 95 soil series have underlying materials consisting of residuum, colluvium, or alluvium.
You'd think the press, if only from a residuum of professional pride, would at some point revolt against a campaign of manipulation so thorough and profitable that its practitioners can gloat about it in the pages of mass-circulation weeklies.
While most commonly referred to as Of One Blood, this text's subtitle, The Hidden Self, immediately introduces James, who wrote an essay by that name, first published in Scribner's Magazine in 1890; indeed, the title of the book that Reuel is reading when the narrative opens, The Unclassified Residuum, is a phrase borrowed from that essay.
Cokers are normally run under severe conditions ([is greater than] 500 [degrees] C) to completely convert the residuum (524 [degree] C+) to gases, distillable liquids (C-5 to 524 [degree] C) and a carbonaceous solid (toluene insoluble), called coke.