revenue

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Related to Revenues: Unearned Revenues, Deferred Revenues

Revenue

Return or profit such as the annual or periodic rents, profits, interest, or income from any type of real or Personal Property, received by an individual, a corporation, or a government.

Public revenues are the sources of income that a government collects and receives into its treasury and appropriates for the payment of its expenses.

revenue

noun compensation, dividends, earnings, emolument, gain, hire, income, intake, interest, livelihood, pay, payment, perquisites, proceeds, profit, receipts, reditus, remuneration, return, reward, salary, vectigal, wages, yield
Associated concepts: appropriation law, internal revenue, revenue bills, revenue law, revenue-producing income, revenue tax
See also: boom, capital, duty, earnings, finance, income, money, pay, perquisite, proceeds, profit, prosperity, rent, resource, substance, tax, wage

REVENUE. The income of the government arising from taxation, duties, and the like; and, according to some correct lawyers, under the idea of revenue is also included the proceeds of the sale of stocks, lands, and other property owned by the government. Story, Const. Sec. 877. Vide Money Bills. By revenue is also understood the income of private individuals and corporations.

References in classic literature ?
But it is not in this aspect of the subject alone that Union will be seen to conduce to the purpose of revenue.
Not content with refusing revenue on his own part, he has bound half his village by an oath to the like treason.
In those branches of administration which the king did not himself direct, such for instance as the "fermes" (the public domains throughout the country on which a revenue was levied), the clerks were to their superior what the clerks of a business-house are to their employer; they learned a science which would one day advance them to prosperity.
Its actual wealth would be fully $760,000,000, and its revenue would be greater than the revenue of the city of New York.
That, brother Sancho," said the canon, "only holds good as far as the enjoyment of the revenue goes; but the lord of the seigniory must attend to the administration of justice, and here capacity and sound judgment come in, and above all a firm determination to find out the truth; for if this be wanting in the beginning, the middle and the end will always go wrong; and God as commonly aids the honest intentions of the simple as he frustrates the evil designs of the crafty.
But we may form very mistaken ideas on this subject, if we do not call to mind in our calculations, that the extent of revenue drawn from foreign commerce must vary with the variations, both in the extent and the kind of imports; and that these variations do not correspond with the progress of population, which must be the general measure of the public wants.
This correspondence, by a meeting between some of the parties, and a separation between the others, could not, to the great detriment of the Post Office revenue, be continued any longer.
The fourth species [1293a] of democracy, the last which was established in order of time, arose when cities were greatly enlarged to what they were at first, and when the public revenue became something considerable; for then the populace, on account of their numbers, were admitted to share in the management of public affairs, for then even the poorest people were at leisure to attend to them, as they received wages for so doing; nay, they were more so than others, as they were not hindered by having anything of their own to mind, as the rich had; for which reason these last very often did not frequent the public assemblies and the courts of justice: thus the supreme power was lodged in the poor, and not in the laws.
There was a tree just behind which bore alligator pears, and all about were the cocoa-nuts which gave the land its revenue.
Belleforet, Father Le Juge, and Corrozet affirm that it was picked up on the morrow, with great pomp, by the clergy of the quarter, and borne to the treasury of the church of Saint Opportune, where the sacristan, even as late as 1789, earned a tolerably handsome revenue out of the great miracle of the Statue of the Virgin at the corner of the Rue Mauconseil, which had, by its mere presence, on the memorable night between the sixth and seventh of January, 1482, exorcised the defunct Eustache Moubon, who, in order to play a trick on the devil, had at his death maliciously concealed his soul in his straw pallet.
Van Baerle began by expending his yearly revenue in laying the groundwork of his collection, after which he broke in upon his new guilders to bring it to perfection.
For a man with one hundred thousand roubles of revenue, which was what everyone fixed as Vronsky's income, such debts, one would suppose, could hardly be embarrassing; but the fact was that he was far from having one hundred thousand.