Rhodian


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LAWS, RHODIAN, maritime. law. A code of laws adopted by the people of Rhodes, who had, by their commerce and naval victories, obtained the sovereignty of the sea, about nine hundred. years before the Christian era. There is reason to suppose this code has not been transmitted to posterity, at least not in a perfect state. A collection of marine constitutions, under the denomination of Rhodian Laws, may be seen in Vinnius, but they bear evident marks of a spurious origin. See Marsh. Ins. B. 1, c. 4, p. 15; this Dict. Code; Laws of Oleron; Laws of Wisbuy; Laws of the Hanse Towns.

References in periodicals archive ?
Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought from Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century.
Rhodian Sea Law, Encyclopydia Britannica, http://www.
Since the expugnation of the Rhodian Isle, Methinks a thousand years are over-past, .
Angel, The Jews of Rhodes: The History of a Sephardic Community (New York: Sepher Hermon Press, 1978), 145-49; Yitzchak Kerem, "The Migration of Rhodian Jews to Africa and the Americas from 1900-1914: The Beginning of New Sephardic Diasporic Communities," in Patterns of Migration, 1850-1914, ed.
Glacken, Traces on the Rhodian Shore (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967); W.
Tom Shaw, Scott Glendenning-Fenton, Mark Hislop, Stuart Lee, Alan Hugh, Clem Muchiti (2), and Rhodian Booth all crossed for the Bears with Graham Healey kicking eight conversions.
She acknowledges important debts to intellectual histories by Clarence Glacken, Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought from Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century (Berkeley, 1967) and Michael Adas, Machines as the Measure of Men: Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance (Ithaca, 1989).
The three Rhodian sculptors did not invent their subject but copied it from one of these sites, specifically "from the Cherubim of Solomons Temple.
Glacken considers this work one of the few writings in the medieval period known to him that combines "a strong religious view of nature with an appreciation of natural beauty and with a frank, exultant admiration for the way the monks, through their skill, their techniques, their water mills, can complete what nature has given them" (Traces on the Rhodian Shore: Nature and Culture in Western Thought from Ancient Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century [Berkeley: University of California, 1967] 213-14).
The technique is one of planned formlessness, a deploying of the many pieces comprising the Rhodian mosaic, rather than a straight-forward guide to the island or a continuous narrative of events [.
Mindful of George Santayana's warning that those who forget history are bound to repeat it, I recommend Traces on the Rhodian Shore by the great 20th-century geographer Clarence Glacken (University of California Press, 1967).