pro-choice

(redirected from Right to choose)
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pro-choice

noun abortion advocate, accepting abortion, approving abortion, endorsing abortion, in favor of abortion, pro-abortion, sanctioning abortion, supporting legalized abortion, supportive of abortionGenerally: self-determination
Associated concepts: abortion on demand, legalized aborrion, spontaneous abortion, voluntary abortion
References in periodicals archive ?
NHS England says it is important that patients are offered their legal right to choose.
For this reason, we are committed to providing members with the right to choose how they receive communications from us.
Why then does he oppose a public worker's right to choose to support a union or not in the workplace?
It is certainly not our position that the government should legislate against a woman's right to choose, but it's good to see that other parties are agreeing with our position,' Baran told Canadian Press.
Another example over the struggle between the right to choose and the right to know is happening right now with bio-identical hormones (See "Natural Hormones are Powerful Chemicals," in the May WHA).
The people were against it but they had no right to choose.
They are politicians intent on bending the law to their own purposes and denying women the right to choose regardless of the consequences.
n Parents will have the right to choose the best school for their child;
More than thirty that limit a woman's right to choose are circulating in that legislature.
They talk of "a woman's right to choose," but in Catholic understanding a woman does not have the moral right to choose the termination of her unborn fetus.
To avoid offending any voters, John Kerry has come down on both sides of three social issues: He says he opposes the death penalty--except for terrorists; he has long identified himself with a woman's right to choose abortion, but recently revealed that he believes "life begins at conception"; he says he is against same-sex marriage, on one hand, and against a constitutional amendment to ban it, on the other.
The physician's right to choose patients, the pamphlet opined, is simply the counterpart of a patient's right to choose a doctor.