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PATENT, ROMAN. The Roman patents will be considered by taking a view of the persons to whom they may be granted; the different kinds of patents; the cost of a patent; and the obligations of the patentee.
     2.-Sec. 1. To whom patents are granted. Every person, whether a citizen of the estates of the pope or foreigner, man or woman, adult or infant, may obtain a patent for an invention, for an improvement, or for importation, by fulfilling the conditions prescribed in order to obtain a grant of such titles. Persons who have received a patent from the Roman government may, afterwards, without any compromise of their rights or privileges, receive a patent in a foreign country.
     3. The different kinds of patents. In the Roman estates there are granted patents for invention, for improvements, and for importations.
     4.-1st. Patents for inventions are granted for, 1. A new kind of important culture. 2. A new and useful art, before unknown. 3. A new and useful process of culture or of manufacture. 4. A new natural production. 5. A new application of a means already, known.
     5.-2d. Patents for improvements may be granted for any useful improvement made to inventions already known and used in the Roman states.
     6.-3d, Patents for importations are granted in two cases, namely: 1. For the introduction of inventions already patented in a foreign country, and the privilege of which patent yet continues. 2. For the introduction of an invention known and freely used in a foreign country, but not yet used or known in the Roman states.
     7.-3. Cost of a patent. The cost of a patent is fixed at a certain sum per annum, without regard to the length of time for which it may have been granted. It varies in relation to patents for inventions and importation. It is ten Roman crowns per annum for a patent for invention and improvement, and of fifteen crowns a year for a patent for importation.
     8.-Sec. 4. Obligation of the patentee. He is required to bring into [?] his invention within one year after the grant of the patent, and not to suspend the supply for the space of one year during the time the privilege shall last.
     9. He is required to pay one half of the tax or expense of his patent on receiving his patent, and the other half during the first month of the second portion of its, duration.

References in classic literature ?
An active figure ran down the steps of the house and showed under the golden lamplight the unmistakable head that resembled the Roman coin.
Across the table the body of the man in the brown dressing-gown lay amid his burst and gaping brown-paper parcels; out of which poured and rolled, not Roman, but very modern English coins.
It happens surely that every one who comes into the darkened room and looks at these things looks up at the Roman and that he is invested in all eyes with mystery and awe, as if he were a paralysed dumb witness.
If you want to give pleasure to others," cried the Roman Candle, "you had better keep yourself dry.
And in the second place, Roman Catholicism is, in my opinion, worse than Atheism itself.
In more recent times the Romans formed a great camp here, the fortifications surrounding which now seem like low, even hills.
I mastered the notion of their communism, and approved of their iron money, with the poverty it obliged them to, yet somehow their cruel treatment of the Helots failed to shock me; perhaps I forgave it to their patriotism, as I had to forgive many ugly facts in the history of the Romans to theirs.
You were formally received into the Roman Catholic Church?
Of the Roman and British civilization the Anglo-Saxons were ruthless destroyers, exulting, like other barbarians, in the wanton annihilation of things which they did not understand.
Therefore, the Romans, foreseeing troubles, dealt with them at once, and, even to avoid a war, would not let them come to a head, for they knew that war is not to be avoided, but is only to be put off to the advantage of others; moreover they wished to fight with Philip and Antiochus in Greece so as not to have to do it in Italy; they could have avoided both, but this they did not wish; nor did that ever please them which is for ever in the mouths of the wise ones of our time:--Let us enjoy the benefits of the time--but rather the benefits of their own valour and prudence, for time drives everything before it, and is able to bring with it good as well as evil, and evil as well as good.
He had caused his car to be placed there, with the tents and luggage of many of his leaders, under a small guard, so that the banners there displayed, together with the car, led the King of the Romans to believe that the Earl himself lay there, for Simon de Montfort had but a month or so before suffered an injury to his hip, when his horse fell with him, and the royalists were not aware that he had recovered sufficiently to again mount a horse.
Now, long long ago, before the Romans came to Britain, some of the people who lived in that part of France sailed across the sea and settled in Britain.