secret

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secret

adjective abstruse, acroamatic, acroamatical, arcane, arcanus, clandestine, close, concealed, covert, cryptic, dark, esoteric, furtive, hidden, latent, mysterious, not public, obscure, occult, occultus, private, privy, recondite, secluded, secretus, shrouded, sly, undisclosed, undivulged, unknown, unpublished, unrevealed, unseen, untold, veiled
Associated concepts: secret lien, undisclosed principal

secret

noun abstruse knowledge, arcana, cabal, classified information, concealed knowledge, confidence, connidential communication, confidential matter, enigma, hidden knowledge, inside information, intimacy, intrigue, mystery, obscure information, personal matter, private affair, private communication, private matter, privileged communication, privileged information, puzzle, recondite knowledge, res arcana, res occulta, unknown information, veiled information
See also: anonymous, clandestine, close, confidence, confidential, covert, enigma, enigmatic, esoteric, furtive, hidden, inscrutable, interior, intimate, mysterious, mystery, personal, private, privy, recondite, seal, seclude, sequester, sly, stealthy, surreptitious, ulterior, uncanny, undisclosed

SECRET. That which is not to be revealed.
     2. Attorneys and counsellors, who have been trusted professionally with the secrets of their clients, are not allowed to reveal them in a court of justice. The right of secrecy belongs to the client, and not to the attorney and counsellor.
     3. As to the matter communicated, it extends to all cases where the client applies for professional advice or assistance; and it does not appear that the protection is qualified by any reference to proceedings pending or in contemplation. Story, Eq. Pl. Sec. 600; 1 Milne & K. 104; 3 Sim. R. 467.
     3. Documents confided professionally to the counsel cannot be demanded, unless indeed the party would himself be bound to produce them. Hare on Discov. 171. Grand jurors are sworn the commonwealth's secrets, their fellows and their own to keep. Vide Confidential communications; Witness.

SECRET, rights. A knowledge of something which is unknown to others, out of which a profit may be made; for example, an invention of a machine, or the discovery of the effect of the combination of certain matters.
     2. Instances have occurred of secrets of that kind being kept for many years, but they are liable to constant detection. As such secrets are not property, the possessors of them in general prefer making them public, and securing the exclusive right for years, under the patent laws, to keeping them in an insecure manner, without them. See Phil. on Pat. ch. 15; Gods. on Pat. 171; Dav. Pat. Cas. 429; 8 Ves. 215; 2 Ves. & B. 218; 2 Mer. 446; 3 Mer. 157; 1 Jac. & W. 394; 1 Pick. 443; 4 Mason, 15; 3 B. & P. 630.

References in classic literature ?
As she spoke, Jo bent over the leaves to hide the trembling of her lips, for lately she had felt that Margaret was fast getting to be a woman, and Laurie's secret made her dread the separation which must surely come some time and now seemed very near.
The matter is disagreeably delicate to handle; but, since the reader must needs be let into the secret, he will please to understand, that, about a century ago, the head of the Pyncheons found himself involved in serious financial difficulties.
We went to a clump of bushes, and Tom made everybody swear to keep the secret, and then showed them a hole in the hill, right in the thickest part of the bushes.
He alone has the secret of the treasure, and can always get as much as he wants," and I halted my camels by the roadside, and ran back after him.
Julia--Miss Warren--you tear my secret from me before its time--I love you, Julia, and would wish to make you my wife.
No, madame," said Buckingham, eagerly, "there is nothing secret in my reason for this determination.
Well, Fred, I don't mind telling you that the secret is that I'm one of a noble race--it has been just found out by me this present afternoon, P.
The doctor was not the sort of man to give his daughter, or any other woman, the slightest chance of surprising his secrets.
When you are married, you will know that the easiest of all secrets to keep is a secret from your husband.
I was thinking about a nice little secret I know, and couldn't help smiling.
Until the prompt and secret action of the Fiscal took him by surprise, the idea of his being charged with the murder of his wife was an idea which we know, from his own statement, had never even entered his mind.
Are you quite sure that you are acting wisely in keeping his secret from