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SEEDS. The substance which nature prepares for the reproduction of plants or animals.
     2. Seeds which have been sown in the earth immediately become a part of the land in which they have been sown; quae sata solo cedere intelliguntur. Inst. 2, 1, 32.

References in classic literature ?
Twinkle, if there lay nine seeds within a flower-cup and the wind bore five away, how many would the blossom have?
It has consisted in always cultivating the best known variety, sowing its seeds, and, when a slightly better variety has chanced to appear, selecting it, and so onwards.
Keating, who resided twelve months on these islands, of the various seeds and other bodies which have been known to have been washed on shore.
Shall I not rejoice also at the abundance of the weeds whose seeds are the granary of the birds?
True is, mee also he hath judg'd, or rather Mee not, but the brute Serpent in whose shape Man I deceav'd: that which to mee belongs, Is enmity, which he will put between Mee and Mankinde; I am to bruise his heel; His Seed, when is not set, shall bruise my head: A World who would not purchase with a bruise, Or much more grievous pain?
I know where you can get some seed wheat if you want to try puttin' it in this fall.
By discarding a claim to knowledge of the ultimate purpose, we shall clearly perceive that just as one cannot imagine a blossom or seed for any single plant better suited to it than those it produces, so it is impossible to imagine any two people more completely adapted down to the smallest detail for the purpose they had to fulfill, than Napoleon and Alexander with all their antecedents.
Of what worth are your courage and cunning, when you have no seed to make your courage and cunning live again?
A FARMER placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed.
Levin knew very well that "a touch of mildew" meant that his English seed oats were already ruined.
It was a great comfort to me afterwards that I did so, for not one grain of what I sowed this time came to anything: for the dry months following, the earth having had no rain after the seed was sown, it had no moisture to assist its growth, and never came up at all till the wet season had come again, and then it grew as if it had been but newly sown.
More seed, more seed,' said Gashford as he closed the window.