water

(redirected from Seltzer water)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: dilute

WATER. That liquid substance of which the sea, the rivers, and creeks are composed.
     2. A pool of water, or a stream or water course, is considered as part of the land, hence a pool of twenty acres, would pass by the grant of twenty acres of land, without mentioning the water. 2 Bl. Com. 18; 2 N. H. Rep. 255; 1, Wend. R. 255; 5 Paige, R. 141; 2 N. H. Rep. 371; 2 Brownl. 142; 5 Cowen, R. 216; 5 Conn. R. 497; 1 Wend. R. 237. A mere grant of water passes only a fishery. Co. Lit. 4 b.
     3. Like land, water is distinguishable into different parts, as the sea, (q.v.) rivers, (q.v.) docks, (q.v.) canals, (q.v.) ponds, q v.) and sewers, (q.v.) and to these may be added at water course. (q.v.) Vide 4 Mason, R. 397 River; Water course.

References in periodicals archive ?
Chocolate and milk became the most popular seltzer water mixture at the turn of the century.
The next four years resulted in two more unsuccessful startups, a celebrity promotional business and a seltzer water company.
They're richer in nutrients and contain much less fat" The issue also featured a "Total Body Workout Poster" and one of those handy little "substitution" charts (loathed by women everywhere), showing men how to slash their calorie intake by making a few minor dietary substitutions: mustard for mayo, popcorn for peanuts, seltzer water for soda, pretzels for potato chips .
1 8-ounce container fruit yogurt 1 cup orange juice 1 cup seltzer water
ATLANTA -- Whether it's a backyard barbeque, a day on the golf course or just a little break at the end of your work day, nothing beats the heat better than the cool taste of Seagram's Sparkling Seltzer Water.
Sparkling water, also known as carbonated water, soda water, seltzer water, or fizzy water, is carbonated artificially.
Strain the mixture into a cocktail glass filled with ice, then top with seltzer water.
Cucumber and mint cool this one down, yogurt smooths it out, and seltzer water jazzes it up.
Subtitled ``How the Last Seltzer-Man Lost and Found his Fizz,'' Richard Krevolin's play chronicles the highs and lows of a writer whose day job is delivering seltzer water on the lower east side of Manhattan.
Soda water, seltzer water, and tonic water might have sugar and calories and are not bottled water.