Sherman Act

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Sherman Act

a US statute that was the first to regulate competition there. It controls contracts, combinations and conspiracies in restraint of trade and agreements and the like designed to bring about monopolies in any part of commerce.
References in periodicals archive ?
21) In considering the second step, note that Congress has not imposed many limits on the Lanham Act's extraterritorial application and therefore the limits of the Act must be analyzed through precedent that has previously been applied to the Sherman Antitrust Act.
The main theme of the Supreme Court ruling was that the Sherman Antitrust Act did apply to the insurance industry.
Dollar London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) panel banks and the British Bankers' Associationviolated the Sherman Antitrust Act by agreeing to submit artificially low estimates of their borrowing costs used in calculating LIBOR.
The statement describes the underlying antitrust principles that guide FTC's application of its statutory authority over unfair methods of competition --even if these methods are not necessarily prohibited under the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 or the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914.
section] 1 of the Sherman Antitrust Act, the United States Supreme
The organizations of agricultural producers acted under the Capper-Volstead Act (1922), a limited antitrust exemption from the Sherman Antitrust Act (1890).
15, 1914, the Clayton Antitrust Act, which expanded on the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890, was signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson.
District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled that the National Collegiate Athletic Association, whose member schools make billions of dollars off the players' performances but don't give the players even a tiny slice of the revenue, is engaged in illegal price fixing - a violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
Accordingly, Congress enacted the Sherman Antitrust Act way back in 1890 to promote competition and outlaw unreasonable restraint of trade.
Debs, William Jennings Bryan, and Grover Cleveland, and a section of primary sources like an excerpt from Mark Twain's Roughing It, a New York Times article on displays of wealth at a high-society ball; an article on the overcrowded, unsanitary conditions of poor residents in tenement buildings; Andrew Carnegie's writings about philanthropy; and the Sherman Antitrust Act.
In 1999, the Department of Justice found that Microsoft had violated the Sherman Antitrust Act.