impairment

(redirected from Specific language impairment)
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impairment

(Damage), noun detriment, disrepair, harm, hurt, injury, loss
Associated concepts: impairment of vision

impairment

(Disability), noun affliction, ailment, debility, deterioration, disablement, disorder, disqualification, feebleness, frailty, handicap, helplessness, illness, impairment, impotence, impotency, inability, innbility to work, inadequacy, incapability, incapacitation, incompetence, incompetency, indisposition, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, infirmity, insufficiency, malady, sickness, unfitness, unsoundness, weakness
Associated concepts: complete disability, continuous disabillty, disability benefits, disability compensation, disability innurance, general disability, medical disability, mental dissbility, partial disability, proof of disability, temporary disability, total disability

impairment

(Drawback), noun detriment, inability, liability, limitation
Associated concepts: impairment of funds, impairment of security
See also: abuse, cost, damage, defacement, defect, deficiency, defilement, deterioration, detriment, disability, disrepair, expense, fault, handicap, harm, injury, penalty, prejudice, sacrifice, wear and tear
References in periodicals archive ?
Working memory capacity and language processes in children with specific language impairment.
Hidden language impairments in children: Parallels between poor reading comprehension and specific language impairment.
Effects of imitative and conversational recasting treatemtn on the acquisition of grammar in children with specific language impairment and younger language-normal children.
Profiles of grammatical morphology and sentence imitation in children with Specific Language Impairment and Down Syndrome.
An examination of verbal working memory capacity in children with specific language impairment.
elementary school students with the condition called specific language impairment
Children with specific language impairment are traditionally defined as having a nonverbal IQ within normal range, no apparent hearing problem, no neurological damage or social-emotional disturbances severe enough to be responsible for their language learning problem.
The biological basis of specific language impairment.
For instance, in a devastating condition known as specific language impairment, people have serious problems communicating with others.
A workshop was held in Siegen, Germany in February-March 2007 to consider the driving force behind the shift from the lexical-semantic to the morpho-syntactic functional systems, what the added value of the new properties is, and why morpho-syntactic properties of the target language are generally more affected in cases of specific language impairment.
Previous research conducted with French-speaking normally developing children and children with specific language impairment has shown a striking asymmetry between present and past tense production--the passe compose--in favor of the present.

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