Statute of Westminster


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Statute of Westminster

1 the Statute of Westminster 1931 distinguished dominions from colonies and legislation applicable to colonies. Dominions were permitted to pass extraterritorial legislation and no UK legislation was to extend to the dominions unless expressly stated to be by dominion consent. The statute has featured in the development of the constitutions of Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It is an important Act in the constitutional law of the UK but also in many other states' constitutions. Britain's empire changed its nature in the latter part of the 19th century into the first half of the 20th century. Granting of dominion status to Canada was the start, and the British North America Act 1867 was replicated in relation to Australia, New Zealand, Newfoundland, the Irish Free State and South Africa. The Balfour Declaration of 1926 referred to freely associated nations within a British Commonwealth of Nations of equal status. Common Crown allegiance was the unifying factor.
2 the Statute of Westminster 1275 was the foundation of the English law of limitation of actions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of the Statute of Westminster was not well understood.
The decisions reached in 1926, 1929 and 1930 were ratified in 1931 with the signing of the Statute of Westminster which paved the way for the Commonwealth.
The final result was the Statute of Westminster, passed by the British Parliament on 11 December 1931.
The Australian and New Zealand decision to alter the rules of royal succession in their law, rather than assenting to a British law, casts doubt on the notion that matters of succession belong to British law alone and that the preamble to the Statute of Westminster is a sufficient mechanism to alter the succession for the former self-governing Dominions.
As notoriously reluctant as New Zealand's political elites were to acquire sovereignty over their law making, through the adoption of the Statute of Westminster Act 1931, we did manage it a full decade earlier than Fischer claims.
The legislation introduced today is in keeping with the Preamble to the Statute of Westminster, 1931, which provides that any changes to the laws governing succession require the assent of Dominion Parliaments.
A Reader's Guide in the front matter groups entries by theme, and a chronology briefly annotates significant dates beginning with the year 1275, when the Statute of Westminster in England began regulation of bail, and ending with laws passed in 2012 permitting gay marriage.
Five years later the British parliament passed the Statute of Westminster removing the British parliament's power to legislate on behalf of the Dominions except at their request and by their consent.
There is also the Statute of Westminster 1931, which requires the assent of various Commonwealth countries to any change to succession.
It is time that we are radical and address this along with other countries who are subject to the statute of Westminster.