succession

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Succession

The transfer of title to property under the law of Descent and Distribution. The transfer of legal or official powers from an individual who formerly held them to another who undertakes current responsibilities to execute those powers.

succession

n. the statutory rules of inheritance of a dead person's estate when the property is not given by the terms of a will, also called laws of "descent and distribution." (See: descent and distribution, inheritance)

succession

noun chain, concatenation, consecutive order, continuatio, cycle, descent, family, issue, lineage, offspring, order, procession, progeny, progression, sequence, series, successorship, train
Associated concepts: hereditary succession, intestate succession, legal succession, line of succession, natural succession, successor employer, successor interest, testamentary succession
Foreign phrases: Haereditas est successio in universum jus quod defunctus habuerit.Inheritance is the succession to every right which the deceased had possessed. Haereditas nihil aliud est, quam successio in universum jus, quod defunctus habuerit. An inheritance is nothing other than the succession to all the rights which the deeeased had. Qui in jus dominiumve alterius succedit jure ejus uti debet. One who succeeds to the ownership rights of another, should enjoy the rights of the other. Non debeo melioris conditionis esse, quam auctor meus a quo jus in me transit. I ought not to be in better condition than he to whose rights I succeed.
See also: birth, bloodline, chain, continuity, cycle, devolution, frequency, hierarchy, lineage, sequence, subrogation

succession

following another, used in relation to the taking over of a body corporate including the Crown. Succession to the Crown is governed by law but can be upset by abdication. Technically, the area of law regulating the passing of property from a deceased person. See INTESTACY, TESTATE.

SUCCESSION, in Louisiana. The right and transmission of the rights an obligations of the deceased to his heirs. Succession signifies also the estate, rights and charges which a person leaves after his death, whether the property exceed the charges, or the charges exceed the property, or whether he has left only charges without property. The succession not only includes the rights and obligations of the deceased, as they exist at the time of his death, but all that has accrued thereto since the opening of the succession, as also of the new charges to which it becomes subject. Finally, succession signifies also that right by which the heir can take possession of the estate of the deceased, such as it may be.
     2. There are three sorts of successions, to wit: testamentary succession; legal succession; and, irregular succession. 1. Testamentary succession is that which results from the constitution of the heir, contained in a testament executed in the form prescribed by law. 2. Legal succession is that which is established in favor of the nearest relations of the deceased. 3. Irregular succession is that which is established by law in favor of certain persons or of the state in default of heirs either legal or instituted by testament. Civ. Code, art. 867-874.
     3. The lines of a regular succession are divided into three, which rank among themselves in the following order: 1. Descendants. 2. Ascendants. 3. Collaterals. See Descent. Vide Poth. Traite des Successions Ibid. Coutumes d'Orleans, tit. 17 Ayl. Pand. 348; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 1; Domat, h.t.; Merl. Repert. h.t.

SUCCESSION, com. law. The mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation aggregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bl. Com. 430.

References in periodicals archive ?
If a designated heir is adequately prepared or if the horse race is far enough along to have produced a clear leader, then the board may be able to follow the normal succession rules and promote the candidate.
Table 4 presents the effects of reliance on CEO succession rules under varying organizational contingencies, and table 5 presents results of models testing alternative explanations.
Under current succession rules, only male offspring can ascend to the Chrysanthemum Throne.
Opposition leader Sam Rainsy sent a letter to the king last week suggesting there should be a return to "ancestral tradition of a hereditary monarchy with clearly defined succession rules.
He said the President's statements create 'uncertainty' even while there is no danger of a 'vacuum in leadership' given clear succession rules in the 1987 Constitution.
Its lack of clear succession rules, as we know them, led to bloody civil conflicts and murders of near relatives.
Under current succession rules, only male offspring can ascend to the imperial throne, meaning that if the 37-year-old princess gives birth to a boy, he will be second in line to the imperial throne after his father, Crown Prince Naruhito, 41.
But the council has prioritized character over succession rules," he said.