cottage

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COTTAGE, estates. A small dwelling house. See 1 Tho. Co. Litt. 216; Sheph. Touchst. 94; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1571, note.
     2. The grant of a cottage, it is said, passes a small dwelling-house, which has no land belonging to it. Shep. To. 94.

References in classic literature ?
He exhausted himself last night," Dorothea said to herself, thinking at first that he was asleep, and that the summer-house was too damp a place to rest in.
He turned to the summer-house window, and took up a pipe and tobacco pouch, left on the ledge.
Before she could speak again, he had turned the corner of the summer-house, and was lost to view in a shrubbery on the westward side of the grounds.
The summer-house was no longer empty as we had left it.
The stranger in the summer-house was now plainly revealed to me as the woman who had attempted to destroy herself from the bridge!
I stepped up to the back of the summer-house without being heard, and I listened to what was going on inside.
This witness was severely cross-examined as to the correctness of his recollection of the talk in the summer-house, and as to his capacity for identifying both the speakers.
The summer-house was choked up by creeping plants; and the appearance of the creepers was followed by the appearance of the birds of night.
They had come, with the creepers, into possession of the summer-house.
Hartright will pay ME no compliments," said Miss Fairlie, as we all left the summer-house.
There's a little summer-house overlooking the river, where we might take a glass of this delicious liquor with a whiff of the best tobacco--it's in this case, and of the rarest quality, to my certain knowledge--and be perfectly snug and happy, could we possibly contrive it; or is there any very particular engagement that peremptorily takes you another way, Mr Swiveller, eh?
The summer-house of which Mr Quilp had spoken was a rugged wooden box, rotten and bare to see, which overhung the river's mud, and threatened to slide down into it.