factor

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Factor

An event, circumstance, influence, or element that plays a part in bringing about a result.

A factor in a case contributes to its causation or outcome. In the area of Negligence law, the factors, or chain of causation, are important in determining whether liability ensues from a particular action done by the defendant.

factor

n. 1) a salesman who sells in his/her own name on behalf of others, taking a commission for services. 2) something that contributes to the result.

factor

(Commission merchant), noun agent, broker, commercial agent, delegate, deputy, envoy, interagent, manager, medium, middleman, one who sells for factorage, proctor, procurator, representative
Associated concepts: consignee, factors' lien

factor

(Ingredient), noun additive, agent, aid, aspect, cause, component, constituent, constitutive element, content, contributing force, determinant, element, elementary unit, feature, integral part, part, portion, segment, unit
See also: aspect, broker, cause, characteristic, component, constituent, dealer, deputy, determinant, element, feature, ingredient, member, part, plenipotentiary, portion, procurator, reason, represent, substitute

factor

1 a mercantile agent. An agent who is in the ordinary course of business entrusted with goods or documents of title representing goods with a view to their sale. A factor has a lien over goods entrusted to him; this lien covers any claims he may have against his principal arising out of the agency. Most factors will be mercantile agents (and have the powers of such) for the purposes of the Factors Act 1889. Under this Act, in certain circumstances a factor may pass a good title to goods entrusted to him.
2 an institution to whom a company assigns its book debts (see FACTORING).
3 in Scotland a landlord or superior's agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Correlating this TGF sample with radio detections of WWLLN and the Earth Networks Total Lighting Network (ENTLN) (Liu and Heckman 2010), 877 TGF/radio associations are obtained (38% association rate).
We choose to use VLF geolocations because of their high accuracy and the large fraction of the TGF sample for which they are available.
In some respects this sample is similar to the known TGF population, which is "frequent near coastlines, large islands, peninsulas, and isthmuses" (Splitt et al.
Of the 24 TGFs, 21 have GBM/VLF associations that are within [+ or -] 200 [micro]s and are thus considered simultaneous, so that the radio signal is very likely from the TGF itself rather than from associated lighting processes (Table ESI).
Since in most cases the radio signal is from the TGF itself, the differing efficiencies of WWLLN and ENTLN for detecting IC lighting are not pertinent.
Because the TGF geolocation uncertainties, originating from the VLF network timing uncertainties, are larger than the spatial resolution of the NEXRAD data, we cannot simply select a single NEXRAD pixel per TGF.
All NEXRAD products were obtained at the radar sampling (available at ~5-min intervals) closest to the TGF time and are in precipitation mode (14 elevation scanning angles).
The EET values accumulated over the TGF uncertainty regions exhibit a unimodal distribution with median value ~11-13 km (Fig.
The range of EET values within a TGF uncertainty region may indicate different storm features.
Although the TGF uncertainty region includes parts of the storm that are strictly unrelated to the TGF production, the respective distribution shown in Fig.
AT1R blockers prevent only the peak concentrations of TGF beta in the brain triggered by angiotensin, which are responsible for the inflammatory reaction.