tautology

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tautology

noun battology, duplication, loquacity, pleonasm, profuseness, redundancy, repetition, surfeit, verbiage, verbosity
See also: redundancy
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposition that the achievement of constitutional government requires its proper understanding may seem self-evident and even faintly tautologous.
I am saying that "genre variation" makes no sense as a parallel to "register variation" because while you can talk about language (registers) varying across genres, it is tautologous to talk about genres (text categories) varying across genres or situations.
But the homogenization of scholarly orientation remains a risk which suggests that my opening question may be tautologous.
If one accepts Belk's definition of materialism, it is tautologous to suggest that materialism causes possessiveness, nongenerosity, and/or envy, for he views these attributes as defining subdimensions of materialism.
Against the view of Eric D'Arcy and others, who see the first principle of the practical order ("do good, avoid evil") as merely formal or tautologous, McInerny holds that the first principle is both descriptive and prescriptive.
Connor goes on to hint at the possibly tautologous nature of this relationship, and explains it in terms of institutional exigencies: that postmodernism, in the form in which it is understood in literature departments, 'serves to concentrate radical or sceptical theory into an institutionally usable form, allowing the business of the literary academy -- the interpretation of texts, the production and accreditation of readings and methodologies -- to go on as usual'.
It can be argued that the one-to-one fit between, say, the Nilo-Saharan 'population' (which is defined linguistically) and the 'Nilo-Saharan' language group is tautologous (even if 'Nilo-Saharan' were not a questionable language family: Trask 1996: 190) and that it is more significant that biological groups like 'Caucasoid' are split between several language families.
Similarly, ostensible dialogues are really monologues; their repetitious self-enclosure matches the colors' continual tautologous self-identity.
Bloch says that the jongleur in the fabliau "Le Roy d'Angleterre et le jongleur d'Ely," who deflects the king's questions about his origins, identity, and destination by pretending to misunderstand them and by giving tautologous, uninformative replies, "is aware that 'sense' and 'good sense' (sen and saver) are the conditions of the courtly and noble life and that madness or a lack of sense is - beyond any overtly radical social gesture - a condition of poetry, if not of all linguistic expression" (16).
If this point seems tautologous, that would be because these "spiritual" figurations of history are still relatively unexamined and quite pervasive today.