tenor

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Tenor

An exact replica of a legal document in words and figures.

For example, the tenor of a check would be the exact amount payable, as indicated on its face.

tenor

noun cast, character, content, course, cut, drift, exemplum, feeling, form, gist, idea, import, manner, meaning, mode, mood, nature, purport, sense, sententia, significance, signification, spirit, stamp, subject matter, tendency, tone, trend, vein
See also: complexion, condition, connotation, content, context, degree, gist, import, magnitude, main point, meaning, mode, signification, spirit, state, substance, temperament

tenor

1 the exact words of a deed, as distinct from their effect.
2 an exact copy or transcript.
3 loosely, the meaning of a document. See also PROVING THE TENOR.

TENOR, pleading. This word, applied to an instrument in pleading, signifies an exact copy; it differs from purport. (q.v.) 2 Phil. Ev. 99; 2 Russ. on Cr. 365; 1, Chit. Cr. Law, 235; 1 Mass. 203; 1 East, R. 180, and the cases cited in the notes. In chancery practice, by tenor is understood a certified copy of records of other courts removed into chancery by certiorari. Gresl. Ev. 309.

References in classic literature ?
Judge not too rashly from hasty and deceptive appearances," said the lady, smiling; "though Major Heyward can assume such deep notes on occasion, believe me, his natural tones are better fitted for a mellow tenor than the bass you heard.
the Bass and Tenor of the Man and the Soprano and Contralto of the two Women?
An officer's peremptory tenor rang out and quickened the stiffened movement of the men.
She had also to anticipate how her visit would pass, the quiet tenor of their usual employments, the vexatious interruptions of Mr.
On arriving at their destination, they burn, slaughter, and destroy, according to the tenor of written instructions, and sailing away from the scene of devastation, call upon all Christendom to applaud their courage and their justice.
Whilst burning-hot napkins, physic, revulsives, and Guenaud, who was recalled, were performing their functions with increased activity, Colbert, holding his great head in both his hands, to compress within it the fever of the projects engendered by the brain, was meditating the tenor of the donation he would make Mazarin write, at the first hour of respite his disease should afford him.
Considering how little satisfaction I got from it at first it is remarkable that I should not have grown more tired of wondering what mystic rites of ennui the Misses Bordereau celebrated in their darkened rooms; whether this had always been the tenor of their life and how in previous years they had escaped elbowing their neighbors.
Lilla, of course, felt lonely in the absence of her cousin, but the even tenor of life went on for her as for others.
At six o'clock, the general having taken his coffee, the carriage again received them; and so gratifying had been the tenor of his conduct throughout the whole visit, so well assured was her mind on the subject of his expectations, that, could she have felt equally confident of the wishes of his son, Catherine would have quitted Woodston with little anxiety as to the How or the When she might return to it.
I am sure, from the tenor of books I have read, that many who have visited this land in years gone by, were Presbyterians, and came seeking evidences in support of their particular creed; they found a Presbyterian Palestine, and they had already made up their minds to find no other, though possibly they did not know it, being blinded by their zeal.
It was nothing but soprano rebecs, counter-tenor rebecs, and tenor rebecs, not to reckon the flutes and brass instruments.
still more full of intelligence than the former; for this order explained Aramis's presence with the king, and that Aramis, in order to have obtained Fouquet's pardon, must have made considerable progress in the royal favor, and that this favor explained, in its tenor, the hardly conceivable assurance with which M.