Territoriality


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Territoriality

A term that signifies a connection or limitation with reference to a particular geographic area or country.

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References in periodicals archive ?
return to territoriality in these different doctrinal contexts.
Age can also have an effect on territoriality of avian species (Stutchbury 1994).
Their expansive and creative conceptions of territoriality must contend with those of others who believe that the silver they dig from the ground will put food on the table.
91) The territoriality doctrine comports with the traditional lex loci delecti approach to conflicts of laws, which was promulgated by Joseph Story and Professor Joseph Beale and codified in the First Restatement of Conflicts.
aporus showed no evidence of breeding territoriality in communal aquaria at the University of California, Los Angeles, or at Children's Aquarium at Fair Park.
The Arbitration Act of 1996 was adopted in an attempt to "remove the anomalies" in the Arbitration Act of 1940 by introducing provisions based on the UNCITRAL Model Laws, the court said, and the 1996 legislation has thus adopted the territoriality principle, which precludes Part I from applying to a foreign-seated arbitration.
In a testimony in a hearing in the Ways and Means Committee, Avi-Yonah rejected both comparative arguments mentioned above as justification for territoriality.
Territorial limits in choice-of-law, personal-jurisdiction, and other areas had given way in the domestic context (albeit for different reasons), which provided a superficial justification for making territoriality less important when addressing transboundary disputes.
The conceptual challenge that Professor Domingo raises for the reader, does hot ignore the precepts of law and territoriality that govern municipal and international law to this day.
Puffing out his dewlap in a display of proud territoriality, he adds a living dimension to our classical tradition, and is proof positive that Sarasota really does offer the perfect blend of nature and art.
During the past three or four decades, this kind of territoriality has been muted, but now Norman Minnick, the editor of Between Water and Song, stakes out his ground--'The severe drought caused by Language poetry and the tedium and irony of the postmodernists are certainly contributing to the ruin"--in familiar terms.