Code of Hammurabi

(redirected from The Code of Hammurabi)

Code of Hammurabi

The Code of Hammurabi was a comprehensive set of laws, considered by many scholars to be the oldest laws established; they were handed down four thousand years ago by King Hammurabi of Babylon. Although the Code of Hammurabi was essentially humanitarian in its intent and orientation, it contained the "eye for an eye" theory of punishment, which is a barbarian application of the concept of making the punishment fit the crime. The Code of Hammurabi recognized such modern concepts as that of corporate personality.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He is a student of sociology, dropping casual references to ancient temple sites and the Code of Hammurabi during a builders conference keynote, contextualizing them within the greater arch of human settlement.
Rehnquist (1924-2005), the Code of Hammurabi (1780 BCE), and the 2012 United Nations Resolution on the Use of the Death Penalty.
From among reference works ranging from The Code of Hammurabi to Pliny's Natural History, from The Domesday Book to Dr.
There are some similarities between the Code of Hammurabi and the Ten Commandments, which has led some scholars to believe that the latter borrowed from the former.
The Code of Hammurabi, dating back to 1754 BC, contains specific legislation regulating surgeons and medical compensation.
A very interesting example of such comparisons is the author's discussion of "an eye for an eye," where he shows that even according to the Code of Hammurabi this law was not understood literally (p.
They include familiar texts like the Babylonian creation and flood stories, the Code of Hammurabi, and ancient treaties/covenants, but also parallels to prophetic symbolic actions and oracles against foreign nations, prayers, hymns, and laments.
The Code of Hammurabi, a stele bearing the most complete and perfect extant collection of Babylonian laws developed during the reign of Hammurabi (1792-1750 BCE), was discovered near the castle in 1901 by French Orientalist Jean-Vincent Scheil.
the Code of Hammurabi presented rules of law governing business conduct, which vividly considered the behavior of agents (employees) during the process of being entrusted with the property (fiduciary assets).
Abortion was outlawed by the Code of Hammurabi, proscribed in the Hippocratic Oath, and subject to the criminal law of every one of the United States within Obama's lifetime.
The Code of Hammurabi defines the rape of a virgin as property damage against her father.
In their 1979 book, "Forty Centuries of Wage and Price Controls," authors Robert Schuettinger and Eamon Butler begin 4,000 years ago with the Code of Hammurabi, itself nearly 4,000 years old.