atmosphere

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atmosphere

noun air, airspace, ambience, aura, background, circumambience, climate, climatic condition, element, environing influence, environment, medium, mood, setting, space, surroundings, weather
Associated concepts: clouding the atmosphere, polluting the atmosphere
References in classic literature ?
the walls are thick, and I shall soon have crossed the atmosphere.
The consumption of these articles would necessarily, little by little, diminish the weight to be sustained, for it must be remembered that the equilibrium of a balloon floating in the atmosphere is extremely sensitive.
Grandfather merely put his finger-tips to his brow and bowed his venerable head, thus Protestantizing the atmosphere.
At length, to the general satisfaction, a heavy storm cleared the atmosphere on the night of the 11th and 12th of December, and the moon, with half-illuminated disc, was plainly to be seen upon the black sky.
For some days past, Captain Bonneville had been made sensible of the great elevation of country into which he was gradually ascending by the effect of the dryness and rarefaction of the atmosphere upon his wagons.
I don't know what it was that came over me," he continued doubtfully, "but the atmosphere seemed suddenly to become unbearable.
Dreary, chill November was howling out of doors, and vexing the atmosphere with sudden showers of wintry rain, or sometimes with gusts of snow, that rattled like small pebbles against the windows.
Even the heavens seemed to share in the dried appearance of the earth, for the sun was concealed by a haziness in the atmosphere, which looked like a thin smoke without a particle of moisture, if such a thing were possible.
The day was hot and apparently calm; yet under such circumstances, the atmosphere can never be so tranquil as not to affect a vane so delicate as the thread of a spider's web.
Do you find the atmosphere of Queen's Hall oppressive?
Tantalised, enraged by the clumsy insensitiveness of the conductor, who put the stress on the wrong places, and annoyed by the vast flock of the audience tamely praising and acquiescing without knowing or caring, so she was not tantalized and enraged, only here, with eyes half-shut and lips pursed together, the atmosphere of forced solemnity increased her anger.
The fact of combustion is in itself enough to show that the proportion of oxygen in the atmosphere is normal and that it is the ether which is at fault.